Marks

(redirected from Marks, Simon, 1st Baron Marks of Broughton)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

mark 1

 (märk)
n.
1. A visible trace or impression, such as a line or spot: a spill that left a mark on the rug; a mark next to each purchased item on the list.
2. A symbol, name, or other identifier, especially:
a. A name, logo, or other indicator used to indicate ownership, origin, or level of quality.
b. A notch made in an animal's ear or hide to indicate ownership.
c. A sign, such as a cross, made in lieu of a signature.
3. A written or printed symbol used for punctuation; a punctuation mark.
4.
a. A number, letter, or symbol used to indicate various grades of academic achievement: got a mark of 95 instead of 100.
b. often marks An appraisal; a rating: earned high marks from her superiors.
5. Nautical
a. A knot or piece of material placed at various measured lengths on a sounding line to indicate the depth of the water.
b. A Plimsoll mark.
6.
a. A distinctive trait or property: Good manners are the mark of a civilized person.
b. A recognized standard of quality: schoolwork that is not up to the mark.
c. A lasting effect: The experience had left its mark on all of us.
d. A specific model, type, or iteration, as of a product or machine, especially when part of a series. Usually used with a number: the mark IV model of this car.
7.
a. Importance; prominence: "a fellow of no mark nor likelihood" (Shakespeare).
b. Notice; attention: a matter unworthy of mark.
8. A target: "A mounted officer would be a conspicuous mark" (Ambrose Bierce).
9. Something that one wishes to achieve; a goal.
10. An object or point that serves as a guide.
11. Slang A person who is the intended victim of a swindler; a dupe.
12.
a. Sports The place from which racers begin and sometimes end their contest.
b. A point reached or gained: the halfway mark of the race.
c. A record: set a new mark in the long jump.
13. Sports
a. A strike or spare in bowling.
b. A stationary ball in lawn bowling; a jack.
14. A boundary between countries.
15. A tract of land in medieval England and Germany held in common by a community.
16. Computers A character or feature in a file, record, or data stream used to locate a specific point or condition.
v. marked, mark·ing, marks
v.tr.
1.
a. To make a visible trace or impression on, as with a spot, line, or dent: marked the wall with a crayon.
b. To form, make, or depict by making a mark: marked a square on the board.
c. To supply with natural markings: gray fur that is marked with stripes.
2.
a. To single out or indicate by or as if by a mark: marked the spot where the treasure was buried; a career marked for glory.
b. To distinguish or characterize: the exuberance that marks her writings; marked the occasion with celebrations.
c. To make conspicuous: a concert marking the composer's 60th birthday.
3. To set off or separate by or as if by a line or boundary: marked off the limits of our property.
4. To attach or affix identification, such as a price tag or maker's label, to.
5. To evaluate (academic work) according to a scale of letters or numbers; grade.
6.
a. To give attention to; notice: Mark her expression of discontent. Mark my words: they are asking for trouble.
b. To take note of in writing; write down: marked the appointment on my calendar.
c. Sports & Games To record (the score) in various games.
7. Sports To guard (an opponent), as in soccer.
v.intr.
1. To make a visible impression: This pen will mark under water.
2. To receive a visible impression: The floor marks easily.
3. Sports & Games To keep score.
4. To determine academic grades: a teacher who marks strictly.
Phrasal Verbs:
mark down
To mark for sale at a lower price.
mark up
1. To deface by covering with marks.
2. To mark for sale at a higher price.
Idioms:
beside the mark
Beside the point; irrelevant.
mark time
1. To move the feet alternately in the rhythm of a marching step without advancing.
2. To suspend progress for the time being; wait in readiness.
3. To function in an apathetic or ineffective manner.

[Middle English, from Old English mearc; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

mark 2

 (märk)
n.
1. An English and Scottish unit of currency that was equal to 13 shillings and 4 pence.
2. Any of several European units of weight that were equal to about 8 ounces (227 grams), used especially for weighing gold and silver.
3. A deutsche mark.
4. A markka.

[Middle English, from Old English marc; see merg- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, translation of German Mark, from Middle High German marc, marke, stamped precious metal bar, half-pound of silver or gold. Sense 4, translation of Finnish markka.]

Mark 1

 (märk)
n.
See Table at Bible.

Mark 2

 (märk)
n.
In Arthurian legend, a king of Cornwall who was the husband of Iseult and the uncle of her lover Tristan.

Mark

, Saint.
Author of the second Gospel in the New Testament and disciple of Saint Peter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marks - English businessman who created a retail chain (1888-1964)
Translations