Marprelate


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Marprelate

(ˈmɑːprɛlɪt)
n
(Biography) Martin, the pen name of the anonymous author or authors of a series of satirical Puritan tracts (1588–89), attacking the bishops of the Church of England
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The Marprelate Tracts: A Modernized and Annotated Edition.
(62) The Daily Worker's reviewer, 'Martin Marprelate', wrote that the novel 'has for its hero a Party, the Levellers', and that readers 'see the Party in all its aspects'.
In this essay, therefore, my aim is to adopt the perspective of what we might call the "long 1580s" of the children's companies, their early period of prominence between the establishment of the Paul's and Blackfriars playhouses and the Marprelate controversy, which appears to have led to the suppression of the Children of Paul's in the early 1590s.
(7) Most scholars agree that the boys stopped playing by 1590 due to the involvement of Lyly, then master and chief playwright for the boys, in the Marprelate controversy.
Richard Tarleton, the well-known professional actor and clown, created the character of "Martin Marprelate," in accordance with the bishops' wishes to mock and parody the reformers' cause in England.
Public scandal in this case was only just getting started, as Harington refers Prince Henry to the Martin Marprelate pamphlets and their satirical treatment of Cooper's misalliance in print.
They are the queer poetics of the Marprelate controversy; the promiscuous parthenogenesis of the Nashe-Harvey pamphlets; theaters of envy in The Poetomachia and Troilius and Cressida; aristocratic remains in Coriolanus and Timon of Athens; and dogges, verse, and effeminate men in the misanthropic railings of Anger, Sharp, and Munda.
Falstaff, Martin Marprelate, and the Staging of Puritanism," Shakespeare Quarterly 46 (1995): 47-75; Grace Tiffany, "Puritanism in Comic History: Exposing Royalty in the Henry Plays," Shakespeare Studies 26 (1998): 256-87; and Paul Whitfield White, "Shakespeare, the Cobhams, and the Dynamics of Theatrical Patronage," in Shakespeare and Theatrical Patronage in Early Modern England, ed.
In part, this is because of the tradition in ecclesiological debate of humorous abuse that stemmed back to the Marprelate tracts of the 1580s and before.
In The Guardian, in addition to the Tamburlaine and Faustus references, we find allusions to The Spanish Tragedy, the Fortune playhouse, "Shakespeare and Ben Johnson," Shakespeare's Henry IV, the Marprelate tracts and Mucedorus.
While John Penry has been proposed as the writer of the Martin Marprelate pamphlets, nothing conclusive has been established, and most students of Shakespeare would have some difficulty seeing Iago as Othello's "protagonist."
Sharpe highlights familiar moments of public debate and unrest: the print campaign that supported the break from Rome, the Pilgrimage of Grace, resistance theory smuggled in from abroad during Mary's reign, controversy over Elizabeth's marriage negotiations, and the Marprelate tracts.