family therapy

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family therapy

n
(Psychiatry) a form of psychotherapy in which the members of a family participate, with the aim of improving communications between them and the ways in which they relate to each other
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.family therapy - any of several therapeutic approaches in which a family is treated as a whole
group psychotherapy, group therapy - psychotherapy in which a small group of individuals meet with a therapist; interactions among the members are considered to be therapeutic
References in periodicals archive ?
Mendenhall, PhD, and Tracy Todd, PhD, The American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Alexandria, Virginia.
Black American client perceptions of the treatment process in a university marriage and family therapy clinic.
During the 2009 Legislative Session, a new comprehensive bill (HB 2532) was introduced, putting marriage and family therapy licensure under the domain of the West Virginia Board of Examiners in Counseling.
Given that the entire sample was surveyed in the state of California and for students focusing on marriage and family therapy studies, results on supervisory practices might be limited to this region and field of practice.
Volker Thomas, Ph.D., is an associate professor of marriage and family therapy, Child Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
Shumaway traces the rise of marriage and family therapy as part of this new discourse about love.
Most licensed marriage and family therapists are also members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, which provides national regulations for qualified therapists and supervisors.
An Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy is divided into two parts: a theoretical section, where commonly used theories are presented with practical case examples, and a section devoted to special issues and topics, such as couples therapy, communication training, marital enrichment and premarital counseling.
Doherty, director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program at the University of Minnesota.
In addition, both the American Counseling Association (1995) and the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (1998) identified religion as an element of human diversity.
And so, in the fall of 1991, at the national conference of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, psychiatrist Steven J.