Marshalsea


Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Marshalsea: Little Dorrit, Marshalsea Court

Marshalsea

(ˈmɑːʃəlˌsiː)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (formerly in England) a court held before the knight marshal: abolished 1849
2. (Law) (formerly in England) a court held before the knight marshal: abolished 1849
3. (Historical Terms) a prison for debtors and others, situated in Southwark, London: abolished in 1842
4. (Law) a prison for debtors and others, situated in Southwark, London: abolished in 1842
[C14: see marshal, -cy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Some of my readers may have an interest in being informed whether or no any portions of the Marshalsea Prison are yet standing.
'Marshalsea Place:' the houses in which I recognised, not only as the great block of the former prison, but as preserving the rooms that arose in my mind's-eye when I became Little Dorrit's biographer.
But, whosoever goes into Marshalsea Place, turning out of Angel Court, leading to Bermondsey, will find his feet on the very paving-stones of the extinct Marshalsea jail; will see its narrow yard to the right and to the left, very little altered if at all, except that the walls were lowered when the place got free; will look upon rooms in which the debtors lived; and will stand among the crowding ghosts of many miserable years.
George's Church, and on the same side of the way, stands, as most people know, the smallest of our debtors' prisons, the Marshalsea. Although in later times it has been a very different place from the sink of filth and dirt it once was, even its improved condition holds out but little temptation to the extravagant, or consolation to the improvident.
'Many eyes, that have long since been closed in the grave, have looked round upon that scene lightly enough, when entering the gate of the old Marshalsea Prison for the first time; for despair seldom comes with the first severe shock of misfortune.
assurance, of Marshalsea, of the duchy chamber of Lancaster, and also
Dorrit's sudden accession to wealth and subsequent release from the Marshalsea debtor's prison, his family embarks on a Grand Tour of the Continent.
Three years later, after her financial situation worsened, she was sent to Marshalsea debtors' prison.
Charles Dickens' father was jailed for unpaid debts in Marshalsea Prison, one of many notorious lockups in the area.
Edey, porter of the Marshalsea, Henry Robinson, girdler, and Garret Saxton, shoemaker, all of Southwark.
Stanev turns to The Puritan to show how Londoners were both literally and metaphorically imprisoned by the city's odors, just as religious dissenters were confined in the noisome Marshalsea prison in Middleton's play.
(10) On April 6 an earthquake shook London during a performance at the Theatre, prompting much public comment; four days later there was a riot at the Theatre, drawing the attention of the Lord Mayor; and a few days after that, Robert Leveson and Law rence Dutton of the Earl of Oxford's players were imprisoned in the Marshalsea for getting into a fight with some Inns of Court men.