Marshalsea

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Marshalsea

(ˈmɑːʃəlˌsiː)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (formerly in England) a court held before the knight marshal: abolished 1849
2. (Law) (formerly in England) a court held before the knight marshal: abolished 1849
3. (Historical Terms) a prison for debtors and others, situated in Southwark, London: abolished in 1842
4. (Law) a prison for debtors and others, situated in Southwark, London: abolished in 1842
[C14: see marshal, -cy]
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References in classic literature ?
Some of my readers may have an interest in being informed whether or no any portions of the Marshalsea Prison are yet standing.
The condemned felon has as good a yard for air and exercise in Newgate, as the insolvent debtor in the Marshalsea Prison.
Many eyes, that have long since been closed in the grave, have looked round upon that scene lightly enough, when entering the gate of the old Marshalsea Prison for the first time; for despair seldom comes with the first severe shock of misfortune.
Stanev turns to The Puritan to show how Londoners were both literally and metaphorically imprisoned by the city's odors, just as religious dissenters were confined in the noisome Marshalsea prison in Middleton's play.
Audrey, therefore, dreams of a prison before it actually occurs to her to look for Marshalsea prison and think of Little Dorrit, whom she next impersonates.
In 1729, some three hundred inmates died in a three-month period alone in London's Marshalsea Prison.
He situated an entire novel at the Marshalsea prison.