Marsilius of Padua


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Related to Marsilius of Padua: John Wycliffe

Mar·sil·i·us of Padua

 (mär-sĭl′ē-əs) 1280?-1343?
Italian philosopher who wrote Defender of the Peace, a work that denied the secular authority of the pope.

Marsilius of Padua

(mɑːˈsɪlɪəs)
n
(Biography) Italian name Marsiglio dei Mainardini. ?1290–?1343, Italian political philosopher, best known as the author of the Defensor pacis (1324), which upheld the power of the temporal ruler over that of the church
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This book examines significant writers in Church or literary history: Dante Alighieri, Marsilius of Padua, William of Ockham, Petrarch, Birgitta of Sweden, and Catherine of Siena.
The topics include Protagoras' cooperative know-how, democracy without elections: popular rule according to Alfarabi, consent and popular sovereignty in medieval political thought: Marsilius of Padua's Defensor pacis, Thomas Paine and democratic contempt, morals and enlightenment: Bolivar's virtuous democracy in the Angustura Address, democracy in the revolutionary thought of Rosa Luxemburg, an alternative democracy: dissent in Gandhi's great trial of 1922, and a new reading on authority and guardianship (wilayah): Ayatollah Muhammad Mahdi Shamsuddin.
Part II examines the works of Sir Robert Filmer and Jacques-Benigne Bossuet, while Part III surveys the writings of Marsilius of Padua and John Ponet.
Along the way, he might refer to Marsilius of Padua, Johan Huizinga, Thomas Muenzer, Karl Lowith, and Manuel Garcia Pelayo.
Frank Godhardt argues that the pope condemned Marsilius of Padua's Defensor Pacis, in 1327 without having read it, presumably on the basis of oral reports from Ludwig of Bavaria's court.
Interestingly, however, the transformation of the word into flesh occurs even in this oppressive context, as Marsilius of Padua's Defensor Pacis affirms poverty--as contrasted with the wealth of the papal totalitarian regime--as a central Christological feature.
Toward the end of the medieval period, Marsilius of Padua restricted Christianity to a nonpolitical role.
Hopper describes theories of the relationship between church and state associated with thirteenth-century figures such as Marsilius of Padua, who predates the life of Thomas Erastus (1524-1583), as offering "a persuasive statement of the Erastian position" (174).
Part of a valuable series presenting current thinking, research, and new questions and methods on selected topics, the present volume contains nine chapters on various aspects of the celebrated thinker Marsilius of Padua. The topics include an overview of his biography, his career in Paris, the influence of his education in medicine in his Defensor pacis, his writings concerning church and state, spirituality, poverty, and the reception of his writing and thought.
The concept of peace in Marsilius of Padua's Civitas
In her discussions of Thomas Aquinas, John of Paris, Marsilius of Padua, and William of Ockham, she illustrates with exceptional clarity how the displacement of civic by legal relations reinforced the dominance of property.