Marsilius of Padua


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Related to Marsilius of Padua: John Wycliffe

Mar·sil·i·us of Padua

 (mär-sĭl′ē-əs) 1280?-1343?
Italian philosopher who wrote Defender of the Peace, a work that denied the secular authority of the pope.

Marsilius of Padua

(mɑːˈsɪlɪəs)
n
(Biography) Italian name Marsiglio dei Mainardini. ?1290–?1343, Italian political philosopher, best known as the author of the Defensor pacis (1324), which upheld the power of the temporal ruler over that of the church
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They are the eagle's flight: Dante's Paradiso VI and the Monarchia; Marsilius of Padua and the question of legitimacy; individual freedom in William of Ockham's Breviloquium; Petrarch, Cola de Riezo, and the Battle of Rome; the prophetic widow: Birgitta of Sweden and the Revelaciones; and Catherine of Siena and the mystical body of the church.
Part II examines the works of Sir Robert Filmer and Jacques-Benigne Bossuet, while Part III surveys the writings of Marsilius of Padua and John Ponet.
Along the way, he might refer to Marsilius of Padua, Johan Huizinga, Thomas Muenzer, Karl Lowith, and Manuel Garcia Pelayo.
See especially Chapter 13 of Discourse Two titled, "On the Status of Supreme Poverty, Which Is Usually Called Evangelical Perfection; And that This Status Was Held by Christ and His Apostles," Marsilius of Padua, Defensor Pacis, trans.
Toward the end of the medieval period, Marsilius of Padua restricted Christianity to a nonpolitical role.
Hopper describes theories of the relationship between church and state associated with thirteenth-century figures such as Marsilius of Padua, who predates the life of Thomas Erastus (1524-1583), as offering "a persuasive statement of the Erastian position" (174).
Part of a valuable series presenting current thinking, research, and new questions and methods on selected topics, the present volume contains nine chapters on various aspects of the celebrated thinker Marsilius of Padua.
Republicanism and Absolutism in the thougth of Marsilius of Padua.
In her discussions of Thomas Aquinas, John of Paris, Marsilius of Padua, and William of Ockham, she illustrates with exceptional clarity how the displacement of civic by legal relations reinforced the dominance of property.
I: Marsilius of Padua and Medieval Political Philosophy, y II: The Defensor Pacis); Marsile de Padoue.
If there were a secularizing tendency, some of its thickest roots grew from theology and canon law, which Marsilius of Padua and others had shown could be used to defend secular royal power.
The World of Marsilius of Padua, edited by Gerson Moreno-Riano.