Mary I


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Mary I

or Mary Tu·dor  (to͞o′dər, tyo͞o′-) 1516-1558.
Queen of England and Ireland (1553-1558) who reestablished Roman Catholicism (1555). Her persecution of Protestants earned her the nickname "Bloody Mary."

Mary I

n
(Biography) family name Tudor, known as Bloody Mary. 1516–58, queen of England (1553–58). The daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, she married Philip II of Spain in 1554. She restored Roman Catholicism to England and about 300 Protestants were burnt at the stake as heretics
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Noun1.Mary I - daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon who was Queen of England from 1553 to 1558Mary I - daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon who was Queen of England from 1553 to 1558; she was the wife of Philip II of Spain and when she restored Roman Catholicism to England many Protestants were burned at the stake as heretics (1516-1558)
House of Tudor, Tudor - an English dynasty descended from Henry Tudor; Tudor monarchs ruled from Henry VII to Elizabeth I (from 1485 to 1603)
References in periodicals archive ?
The consequence of annulment of Henry's marriages to Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn was that the future Mary I and Elizabeth I respectively were declared to be illegitimate.
Knox, a Scottish author, writes against women's rule in general, but his indictment is specifically addressed to two Catholic queens in the British Isles at that time: Mary of Guise (15151560), Regent of Scotland after the death of her husband, James V, and Mary Tudor or Mary I of England (1516-1558).
However, after Maher's strike, Tipp panellist Niall O'Meara quickly replied with a superb goal to restore Mary I's advantage.
Cast in the form of a series of first-person poetic narratives, delivered by the ghosts of tragically fallen political figures from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, the Mirror was a work begun in Mary I's reign that became an Elizabethan and Jacobean bestseller, going into seven editions between 1559 and 1621.
In "Princess Elizabeth Travels Across Her Kingdom," Carole Levin elaborates on the travels (real and fictional) of Princess Elizabeth Tudor during the reigns of her half-siblings, Edward VI and Mary I. Levin astutely argues that in contrast to the progresses taken by Elizabeth as queen, the (often forced) journeys she made as princess served not just as a way for her to present herself to the people of England but as a focus for later biographers to create a mythos about the young Elizabeth.
While Elizabeth may not have been aware that Ferrers was the author of the Lady of the Lake's address, it can be said with much more certainty that she knew who he was, as his multi-faceted career brought him periodically into the limelight over the course of the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I.
Helen Castor ends with a discussion of Mary I's coming to power after the Lady Jane Grey interlude.
Subjects include Oliver Cromwell, John Pym, Mary I and also Queen Elizabeth's Locket Ring showing portraits of herself and her mother Anne Boleyn.
Beem's scope is wide, covering Matilda's brief suzerainty over southwestern England in the twelfth century; Mary I's sad five-year reign in the sixteenth century; the reign of Queen Anne in the early eighteenth century, focusing on role of her consort, Prince George of Denmark; and finally, Queen Victoria's handling of the Bedchamber Crisis of 1839.
Clever fools are described in chapters focused on the subcategories of 'Warrior Fools', 'Norman Buffoons', 'Minstrel Fools', and '"Jugler" and Jester'; 'innocents' are given two chapters covering the medieval and Tudor periods, in addition to more specific studies of Will Somers and Jane, Queen Mary I's natural.
In this period there were, successively, four official religious policies: Henry VIII's national Catholicism, Edward VI's radical Prorestantism, Mary I's Counter-Reformation Catholicism, and Elizabeth I's cautious Protestantism.