Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley


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Noun1.Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley - English writer who created Frankenstein's monster and married Percy Bysshe Shelley (1797-1851)Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley - English writer who created Frankenstein's monster and married Percy Bysshe Shelley (1797-1851)
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1797: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, author in 1818 of Frankenstein, was born in London.
| 1797: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, second wife of poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and author, in 1818, of Frankenstein, was born in London.
The Letters of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. Edited by Betty T.
'Frankenstein, or, the Modern Prometheus' written by 19-year-old Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was the precursor to the fantasy and science-fiction novels of today.
| 1797: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, second wife |of poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and author, in 1818, of Frankenstein, was born in London.
The Annotated Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, edited by Susan J.
Bennett edited The letters of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley in 3 volumes, published, respectively, in 1980, 1983, and 1988, as well as Selected letters of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, published in 1995.
The Shelley (paternal) side of the family has been here since Jamestown, but is distantly related to Percy Bysshe and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. People in my family have always been good with their hands.
It's also, of course, the period during which Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley wrote poems and novels that confronted and in some cases even anticipated the scientific leaps occurring all around them.
Coetzee, Confucius, Charles Dickens, John Donne, Arthur Conan Doyle, Euripides, Dario Fo, Anatole France, Mohandas Gandhi, Robert Graves, Henrik Ibsen, Franz Kafka, Primo Levi, Karl Marx, Anais Nin, Amos Oz, Harold Pinter, Salman Rushdie, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Stendahl, Rabindranath Tagore, J.R.R.
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's 1818 novel "Frankenstein" has been recycled again and again through the centuries and will presumably wind up as a hit stage tuner one of these days.
Published in 1830, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's second and last historical romance, The Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck, elicited reviews that questioned not only her legitimacy as a historical romancer, but also the damaging effects her "feminine" imaginative excesses could have on both the historical record and the literary establishment.