masa


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ma·sa

 (mä′sə)
n.
Dough made of dried corn that has been soaked in limewater then rinsed and ground, used especially in tortillas and tamales.

[American Spanish, from Spanish, dough, from Old Spanish, from Latin massa, mass, dough; see mass.]

masa

(ˈmæsə)
n
(Cookery) Mexican cookery a type of dough made from maize and used to make tamales, tortillas, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Masa - an independent group of closely related Chadic languages spoken in the area between the Biu-Mandara and East Chadic languages
Chadic, Chadic language, Chad - a family of Afroasiatic tonal languages (mostly two tones) spoken in the regions west and south of Lake Chad in north central Africa
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul Bonesteel, who wrote and directed a fine 2002 documentary of Masa's life called The Mystery of George Masa, gives some sense of the burdens Masa bore and the often trail-less terrain he traversed during the decade-and-a-half or so he roamed the wilderness.
In addition, to celebrate Masa's 28th anniversary, the cost of viewing trips has been slashed to just pounds 28 per couple, which includes two nights and three days with a dedicated property adviser.
El amplio margen de masa corporal en los perros (Canis familiaris) ha llamado la atencion de numerosos investigadores, quienes se han interesado por evaluar las potenciales consecuencias fisiologicas que esta variacion representa [14].
Masa said there already existing buying stations in Norala town, which is considered as the province's rice granary.
Masa raises dizzying amounts of capital in a very short period of time -- famously, Mohammad bin Salman, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, committed $45 billion to Masa's first Vision Fund after a 45-minute meeting -- and commits it almost as quickly.
The second of its kind to be held this year, the MASA 19.2 focuses on building interoperability and enhancing the capabilities of both the AFP and US armed forces.
But unlike Alsa Masa, CMP volunteers will remain unarmed, Carranza said.