Masaccio


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Ma·sac·cio

 (mə-sä′chē-ō, mä-sät′chō) Originally Tommaso di Mone. 1401-1428.
Italian painter of the Florentine school whose revolutionary use of linear perspective and mastery of light and shade profoundly influenced Renaissance painting.

Masaccio

(Italian maˈzattʃo)
n
(Biography) original name Tommaso Guidi. 1401–28, Florentine painter. He was the first to apply to painting the laws of perspective discovered by Brunelleschi. His chief work is the frescoes in the Brancacci chapel in the church of Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence
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She resembled what she had been, in the same degree that a virgin by Masaccio, resembles a virgin of Raphael,--weaker, thinner, more delicate.
Filippo Camerotta, del Museo Galileo de Florencia, analiza exhaustivamente la Trinidad del Carmine de Florencia, obra de Masaccio, basada en el uso de la perspectiva, en la que los criticos han visto siempre la influencia de Brunelleschi, la cual, segun Vasari, se identificaba con el metodo de interseccion de la piramide visual en planta y alzado.
Brunelleschi was a close friend of Donatello and the painter Masaccio (1401-1428).
One important early example is The Expulsion from the Garden (1526), by Masaccio. Banished from paradise, Eve throws her head back in despair, covering her body in shame.
The Blue Tower may be seen as a painter's palette with endless possibilities of semantic overflows and associative explosion, which reminds the reader of neoclassical (Masaccio) and modern art (Giacometti).
"I'd noticed it before - first, in Masaccio's fresco of Adam and Eve in the Brancacci Chapel in Florence (are you impressed yet by my shameless name-dropping?) and then in Durer's etching of them and in paintings by Lucas Cranach.
In Tuscan sunlight Masaccio painted his belief that St.
She must have felt like Masaccio, strolling with Alberti, opining how a spot on the horizon was not an endpoint but a marker of infinite space.
For the first time the reader was invited to participate in the historically remote everyday by a process of bodily triangulation: We would feel with our bodies, and see with our embodied eyes, what the beholders of Masaccio and Filippo Lippi saw.
An interesting aspect of Masolino and Masaccio's collaboration, briefly commented on here by Frosinini, but discussed by the author in greater detail elsewhere, is that prior to working on the Brancacci Chapel they collaborated on the Carnesecchi altarpiece in the church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Florence--with Uccello also, according to a number of sixteenth-century sources.
"I have been moved and influenced in particular by the frescoes by the Italian Renaissance master Masaccio."
Contemporary criticism has finally recognized this aspect of Gentile's art as having a great deal in common with Masaccio, that perennial hero of the "real" Renaissance.