grammatical gender

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Related to Masculine gender: common gender, Neuter gender

grammatical gender

Modern English is largely an ungendered language. Whereas other languages might have masculine and feminine forms for nouns depending on the verbs, articles, or adjectives they are used with, English nouns by and large remain neutral. However, a personal pronoun can be inflected for gender to correspond to the gender of the person (and, in some cases, an animal) it represents.
Personal pronouns are only inflected for gender when they are in the third person and singular—first-person and second-person pronouns (singular or plural) and third-person plural pronouns remain gender neutral.
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Noun1.grammatical gender - a grammatical category in inflected languages governing the agreement between nouns and pronouns and adjectives; in some languages it is quite arbitrary but in Indo-European languages it is usually based on sex or animateness
grammatical category, syntactic category - (grammar) a category of words having the same grammatical properties
feminine - a gender that refers chiefly (but not exclusively) to females or to objects classified as female
masculine - a gender that refers chiefly (but not exclusively) to males or to objects classified as male
neuter - a gender that refers chiefly (but not exclusively) to inanimate objects (neither masculine nor feminine)
References in classic literature ?
But on Miss Mills observing, with despondency, that it were well indeed for some hearts if this were so, I explained that I begged leave to restrict the observation to mortals of the masculine gender.
I subsequently found out that the fabric they were engaged in making was of a peculiar kind, destined to be worn on the heads of the females, and through every stage of its manufacture was guarded by a rigorous taboo, which interdicted the whole masculine gender from even so much as touching it.
It would tire you to remember that DO meant b, TU o, and RO y, and that to say he-boy you must prefix the ape masculine gender sound BU before the entire word and the feminine gender sound MU before each of the lower-case letters which go to make up boy--it would tire you and it would bring me to the nineteenth hole several strokes under par.
Males displaying behavior associated with a masculine gender role have been judged as more well-adjusted, more likeable, and more physically attractive as compared to males displaying behavior consistent with a feminine gender role (Shinar, 1978).
Fred Maus has argued, in "Masculine Discourse in Music Theory," that music-theoretical discourse is gendered.(8) He illustrates this gendering using a set of four paired terms developed in John Rahn's "Aspects of Musical Explanation."(9) He shows that "in each pair, the term that refers to mainstream professional discourse [that is, |digital,' |time-out,' |top-down' or |concept-driven,' and |theory of piece'] is also the term that associates with masculine gender." The other term in each pair, "analog," "in-time," "bottom-up" or "data-driven," and "theory of experience," is gendered feminine.
The critics last week said, "The impression conveyed was that the masculine gender of Jesus is a matter of indifference." They added: We "must not capitulate to the destructive agenda of radical reformists who form the backbone of dissent and division in North American Catholicism." Holy art form!
The cop, who has been serving in the police force since 2010, took the decision to change her gender after she felt connected more with the masculine gender due to what she describes as hormonal imbalances.
Men learn that the masculine gender role is there in the culture with its models of manhood displayed around them, but each male, often feeling alone, makes continual choices about negotiating the conditioning they know is there.
(We can teach the world a thing or two about Equal Rights Amendment - maybe in favor of the masculine gender this time).
This body of research illustrates that clinical eating disorders amongst males are consistently inclusive of significantly elevated endorsement of feminine gender roles, and reduced endorsement of masculine gender roles (Murnen & Smolak, 1997), and that boys and adolescent males who report greater endorsement of femininity also report greater dieting behaviour and food preoccupation and (Thomas et al., 2000).
In the novels and plays written by authors such as John Osborne, Thomas Hinde, and Alan Sillitoe we find language being used as the primary way of expressing uncertainty concerning masculine gender roles and responsibilities, namely the confusion over how those roles and responsibilities should be defined.
Additionally, men and women who reported strongly masculine gender role characteristics surpassed the performance of undifferentiated participants.