masculinist

(redirected from Masculist)
Related to Masculist: Masculinist

masculinist

(ˈmæskjʊlɪnɪst) or

masculist

n
an advocate of the rights of men
adj
of, characterized by, or relating to men's rights
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

masculinist

[ˈmæskjʊlɪnɪst] ADJmasculino
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

masculinist

adjmaskulinistisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Spivak believes in the need of a group of people, a "masculist vanguard", as she calls it that should lead the way in new developments or ideas.
One pioneering woman's breakthrough is rarely anywhere near enough to change a masculist systemic culture.
Rare exceptions to this include Nyairo and Ogude's (2005) discussion of how a Kenyan hip-hop track became 'official state culture' after its use in the 2002 presidential campaign and Evan Mwangi's (2004) analysis of the ways in which masculist tropes in East African hip-hop texts borrow from the discourses of nation building.
(22.) Christine Overall argues m "Feminism, Ontology, and Other Minds," that the "other minds problem" is peculiar to "masculist" ways of thinking, in Feminist Perspectives: Philosophical Essays on Method and Morals, ed.
One of these four masculist fanatics somehow got hold of the microphone, and he began shouting, "Away with all men wim's finery and decorations!
Describing corporate structure as "masculist," (70) they fault it for disempowering individuals by separating them from one another through hierarchy and specialization, and from themselves through required separations between elements of personal and professional life.
I don't agree, in particular, with his analysis of the "masculist utopia" in Ethan of Athos which bypasses the playful irony of Bujold's innovative perspective, especially her use of gender reversal to its fullest potential, when one considers other chronologically close works by women authors.
Not only does Huber seek to re-interpret the tale as a means of deflating masculist ideologies about women's patterns of development, but she also sees in the story of Psyche's transformation a holistic and gender-neutral "approach to theorizing knowledge" (p.
As Sedgwick argues, feminist critics had similarly constructed gendered readings of the canon of mastery, even when gender was not a central consideration: "It is through this mechanism [gendered reading] that feminism has had so magnetic an effect on the very insides as well as on the surround of the male and masculist canon" ("Pedagogy" 141).
But it less does that than the reverse: the masculist attitudes in evidence seem very familiar from British history; and their application in colonial practice - while revealing some nice contradictions - appears no more than an adaptation to the well-known racial idiosyncracies of Indian colonialism.
However, the interventions of the "masculist" voice, these Laws of the Father, occur at points where the voices of women's experience undermine the authoritative version that would otherwise describe (and describe, or disempower, them from writing) their lives.