mastectomy

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Related to Masectomy: radical mastectomy

mas·tec·to·my

 (mă-stĕk′tə-mē)
n. pl. mas·tec·to·mies
Surgical removal of all or part of a breast, sometimes including excision of the underlying pectoral muscles, associated skin, and regional lymph nodes, usually performed as a treatment for cancer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mastectomy

(mæˈstɛktəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
(Surgery) the surgical removal of a breast
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mas•tec•to•my

(mæˈstɛk tə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
the surgical removal of all or part of the breast or mamma.
[1920–25; < Greek mast(ós) breast]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mastectomy


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Surgery to remove a breast.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mastectomy - surgical removal of a breast to remove a malignant tumormastectomy - surgical removal of a breast to remove a malignant tumor
ablation, cutting out, extirpation, excision - surgical removal of a body part or tissue
modified radical mastectomy - removal of a breast and the pectoralis minor and some lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
radical mastectomy - removal of a breast and the underlying muscles (pectoralis major and pectoralis minor) and lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
simple mastectomy - removal of a breast leaving the underlying muscles and the lymph nodes intact
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
mastectomia

mastectomy

[mæˈstektəmɪ] N (Med) → mastectomía f
she had to have a mastectomytuvieron que hacerle una mastectomía
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mastectomy

[mæˈstɛktəmi] nmastectomie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mastectomy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mastectomy

[ˌmæsˈtɛktəmɪ] nmastectomia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mas·tec·to·my

n. mastectomía. V.: mammectomy
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mastectomy

n (pl -mies) mastectomía; modified radical — mastectomía radical modificada
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He eventually had a second masectomy, as well as having "nipples" tattooed on his chest, which he says has made a huge difference.
In another case from HCG, a patient who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 27 and treated in 2007 opted for breast conservation, against a full masectomy -- and delivered a healthy baby boy in 2013.
Victoria is a breast cancer survivor, while Michelle feels deeply insecure about scars on her body as a result of a double masectomy five years ago.
Julia Child had undergone a radical masectomy in 1968, and, in 1974, Paul Child had a botched heart bypass operation from which, Prud'homme said, he never fully recovered.
The mum-of-one said she became a "shadow" of her former self after discovering a lump in 2010, and going through a masectomy and hormone therapy.
Results found the fear the cancer may come back was the most frequent reason, followed by the perception that a double masectomy is the best treatment.
She had a masectomy and Meg competed at Crufts weeks later 140416MGAMEG_013 IAN COOPER
After discovering she had the faulty BRCA2 gene - and therefore a high chance of developing breast cancer - Michelle made the brave move to have a double masectomy.