mashup

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mash-up

or mash·up (măsh′ŭp′)
n.
An audio or video recording that is a composite of samples from other recordings.

mashup

(ˈmæʃʌp)
n
1. (Pop Music) a piece of recorded or live music in which a producer or DJ blends together two or more tracks, often of contrasting genres
2. (Computer Science) a hybrid website that collates and displays information taken from various other online sources
[C20: from mash blend + up]
References in periodicals archive ?
Growing out of the rap and hip hop genres as well as advances in digital editing tools, music mashups have emerged as a defining genre for post-Napster generations.
End users can create kinds of mashups which combine various data-intensive services to form new services.
A new iPhone app has been launched that allows users to transform text messages into video mashups.
His cover version medleys and mashups of international artists including Adele, Justin Timberlake, Britney Spears, Taylor Swift and Bruno Mars routinely go viral.
The mashups presented in this book are all on the infinitely better side, I was happy to see.
More Library Mashups is the second installment of data mashups that can be used in libraries.
Building on her highly successful Library Mashups (2009), Nicole Engard edits a useful collection of articles that detail the ways that libraries of all sizes can use and combine free or inexpensive digital tools to create a better library experience for all.
Mashups are videos that have their origin in the music sampling culture and are considered recontexualizations of already existing materials (cf.
Su exito esta conducido por la flexibilidad y la democratizacion de la creacion y manipulacion de contenido mediante los fenomenos como las wikis, los blogs, el etiquetado colaborativo y uno muy importantes para las organizaciones en la actualidad: los mashups (Young, 2009).
Mashups are gaining popularity and they are applied in a large number of domains, they can be used from normal internet users to professionals or applications developers.
Although they have garnered limited traction in the speech market to date, interest in mashups has been rising for a variety of reasons.
Nicole Engard's Library Mashups offers a compilation of successful mashups from a variety of libraries including Yale University, Temple University, and Manchester City Library as well as companies such as LibLime.