Masora


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Related to Masora: Masorah, Massorah

Ma·so·ra

also Ma·so·rah  (mə-sôr′ə)
n.
1. The body of Judaic tradition relating to correct textual reading of the Hebrew scriptures.
2. The critical notes made on manuscripts of the Hebrew scriptures before the tenth century, which embody this tradition.

[Hebrew māsôrâ, from māsar, to hand over; see msr in Semitic roots.]

Mas′o·ret′ic (măs′ə-rĕt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Masora

(məˈsɔːrə) ,

Masorah

,

Massora

or

Massorah

n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) the text of the Hebrew Bible as officially revised by the Masoretes from the 6th to the 10th centuries ad, with critical notes and commentary
2. (Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) the collection of these notes, commentaries, etc
[C17: from Hebrew: tradition]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Masora - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of textsMasora - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of texts
textual criticism - comparison of a particular text with related materials in order to establish authenticity
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following John Wansbrough, Pavlovitch uses the term masora from the rabbinic tradition to refer to the linguistic understanding of kalala, while he employs the term halakha when the legal context is meant (p.
Hundreds of Jewish sages over many centuries developed the Masora as a set of standards and rules to preserve and standardize scripture as it was transmitted from generation to generation, says Ofer.
The accused are Alpha Muzvidzwa, 48, a traffic officer with Harare Council, and David Masora, unemployed.
[TORAH NEVI'IM U-KHETUVIM] = BIBLIA HEBRAICA LENINGRADENSIA: PREPARED ACCORDING TO THE VOCALIZATION, ACCENTS, AND MASORA OF AARON BEN MOSES BEN ASHER IN THE LENINGRAD CODEX.
13 Yehuda Leb Gerst, Yidishkeytun Veltishkeyt (Lodz: Masora, 1938); "Ha'masoret shel Sinat Israel."