Masorah


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Ma·so·ra

also Ma·so·rah  (mə-sôr′ə)
n.
1. The body of Judaic tradition relating to correct textual reading of the Hebrew scriptures.
2. The critical notes made on manuscripts of the Hebrew scriptures before the tenth century, which embody this tradition.

[Hebrew māsôrâ, from māsar, to hand over; see msr in Semitic roots.]

Mas′o·ret′ic (măs′ə-rĕt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ma•so•rah

or Ma•so•ra

(məˈsɔr ə, -ˈsoʊr ə)

n.
a body of scribal notes that form a textual guide to the Hebrew Old Testament, compiled from the 7th to 10th centuries A.D.
[< Hebrew māsōrāh]
Mas•o•ret•ic (ˌmæs əˈrɛt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Masorah - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of textsMasorah - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of texts
textual criticism - comparison of a particular text with related materials in order to establish authenticity
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References in periodicals archive ?
David Marcus presents a fascinating explanation of the doublets and catchwords in the Masorah, rabbinic comments in the margins of the biblical text.
However, when tracing the transmission of the Masorah (chain of tradition), Maimonides (Rambam) mentions the rabbinical court of Ezra, known as the "Men of the Great Assembly", (4) and notes that the last of these sages was Simeon the Just, whom he describes as the high priest some time after Ezra.
(13) The Masorah is a collection of critical and explanatory notes on the Hebrew text of the Old Testament from about the 7th-11th centuries AD, traditionally accepted as an authoritative exegetic guide, chiefly in matters of pronunciation and grammar.
Saadia Gaon, the Spanish linguists and the Ba'alei Masorah in chronological order, with forthcoming volumes to represent others.
Among their topics are reflections on the text of the Book of Job, some difficulties encountered by ancient translators, a comparative study of the Masorah Magna and Parva of the Book of Deuteronomy as attested in the Leningrad and Madrid M1 manuscripts, and lexical ignorance and the ancient versions of Proverbs.
He expected this to be fairly routine, a short interruption in the work schedule on his book about the Hebrew Masorah. As late as four days before he entered the hospital, on February 20, 1997, Kelley wrote, "I'm busy taking tests and making last minute plans for surgery on the 24th (next Monday) and won't be able to do anything else at this time." (18) In the postoperative ward, immediately after surgery, Kelley suffered a sudden heart attack.
The Roy's message is the following: When you know your Way--your point of departure and goals--then use philosophy, science and the humanities to illumine your exposition, sharpen your categories, probe the profundities and subtleties of the masorah and reveal its charm and majesty; in so doing you should be able to command respect from the alienated and communicate with some who might otherwise be hostile or indifferent to your teaching as well as to increase the sensitivity and spirituality of the committed.