famine

(redirected from Mass Starvation)
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fam·ine

 (făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. A drastic shortage; a dearth.
3. Severe hunger; starvation.
4. Archaic Extreme appetite.

[Middle English, from Old French, from faim, hunger, from Latin famēs.]

famine

(ˈfæmɪn)
n
1. a severe shortage of food, as through crop failure or overpopulation
2. acute shortage of anything
3. violent hunger
[C14: from Old French, via Vulgar Latin, from Latin famēs hunger]

fam•ine

(ˈfæm ɪn)

n.
1. extreme and general scarcity of food, esp. within a large geographical area.
2. any extreme scarcity.
3. Archaic. starvation.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French, derivative of faim hunger (< Latin famēs)]

famine

, famish - Famine and famish come from Latin fames, "hunger."
See also related terms for hunger.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.famine - an acute insufficiencyfamine - an acute insufficiency    
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
calamity, catastrophe, tragedy, disaster, cataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
the Great Calamity, the Great Hunger, the Great Starvation, the Irish Famine - a famine in Ireland resulting from a potato blight; between 1846 and 1851 a million people starved to death and 1.6 million emigrated (most to America)

famine

noun hunger, want, starvation, deprivation, scarcity, dearth, destitution refugees trapped by war, drought and famine
Quotations
"They that die by famine die by inches" [Matthew Henry Expositions on the Old and New Testament]
Translations
مَجاعَةنَقْص، مَجاعَه، جوع
hladomor
hungersnødsult
nälänhätä
glad
éhínség
hallæri
飢饉
기근
badas
bads
hladomor
lakota
hungersnöd
ความขาดแคลนอาหาร
nạn đói

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
A. N (= hunger) → hambruna f; (= shortage) → escasez f
B. CPD famine relief Nayuda f contra el hambre

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
nfamine f
modif
famine relief → aide f aux victimes de la famine
famine victim → victime f de la famine

famine

n (lit)Hungersnot f; (fig)Knappheit f; to die of famineverhungern

famine

[ˈfæmɪn] ncarestia

famine

(ˈfӕmin) noun
(a) great lack or shortage especially of food. Some parts of the world suffer regularly from famine.

famine

مَجاعَة hladomor hungersnød Hungersnot λιμός hambruna nälänhätä famine glad carestia 飢饉 기근 hongersnood hungersnød głód fome, penúria голод hungersnöd ความขาดแคลนอาหาร kıtlık nạn đói 饥荒

famine

n. hambre, carestía.
References in periodicals archive ?
dpa Geneva The United Nations is trying to prevent mass starvation in war-ravaged Yemen by increasing its food distribution from 8 million to 14 million people, the World Food Programme (WFP) said Friday.
The United Nations estimates that fighting in Hodeida could inflict mass starvation on as many as 8mn of the country's 28mn Yemenis.
From describing the Renewable Fuel Standard as unethical, to comparing people who believe in climate science to pagans, to saying that environmentalism will lead to mass starvation or other large-scale calamities, her tone, her words and her actions are simply unacceptable.
Summary: In the 1960s, when biologist Paul Ehrlich was predicting mass starvation due to rapid population growth, plant breeder Norman Borlaug was developing the new crops and approaches to agriculture that would become mainstays of the Green Revolution.
Mumtaz said that with every passing year, Pakistan was getting close to the brink of mass starvation because of a drastic cut in water availability from 5,000 cubic meters per capita in 1950s to 1000 cubic meters in 2010.
Those carrying donations of food -- Israeli food only - also support capping the food intake of people in Gaza at a level that will produce widespread malnutrition but stop short of mass starvation. An Israeli Government advisor, Dov Weissglass, once 'joked' publicly that "The idea is to put the Palestinians on a diet, but not to make them die of hunger." The Israelis have announced a daily per person calorific intake they will allow to Palestinians in Gaza, micro-managing Palestinian hunger in line with Dov Weissglass' announcement.
It has long represented the contradictions of a country that is constantly facing mass starvation and energy shortages while a bloated military dictatorship live lives of excess.
Critics say the lessons extol the benefits of one-party rule, equate multi-party democracy to chaos, and gloss over events like the bloody Tiananmen crackdown and the mass starvation of Mao s Cultural Revolution.
"Again, they are openly talking that humanitarian assistance should be subject to political agreement, which in essence they are bringing to the table the policy of mass starvation as a political weapon and for political gains." Sudan was refusing to allow humanitarian assistance to reach the civilians in the rebel controlled areas expressing fears that rebel would benefit from food dedicated to civilians.
I, however, was not convinced, especially because of the terrible stories of purges, concentration camps and mass starvation coming from Russia (the Left claimed this was right-wing propaganda - sounds familiar).
It will inevitably be a world of hardship and scarcity, but it will also, if we look ahead and plan now, be a world of adequacy, one where local food from local North East farms, such as the planned Gibside Community Farm, is able to feed local North East stomachs as the only alternative to mass starvation.