mass extinction


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mass extinction

n.
The extinction of a large number of species within a relatively short period of time, as between the Cretaceous and Tertiary Periods when three-quarters of all species on earth, including most dinosaurs, became extinct.
References in periodicals archive ?
[USA], Sept 1 (ANI): Around 420 million years back in the pre-historic Silurian Period, Earth suffered a major mass extinction, which wiped out almost 23 per cent of the marine life.
Continued accumulation of carbon dioxide in the world's oceans could trigger a chemical reaction in the planet's carbon cycle that could potentially lead to a mass extinction event.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers say mercury buried in ancient rock provides the strongest evidence yet that volcanoes caused the biggest mass extinction in the history of the Earth.
It's well accepted that we're in the midst of Earth's sixth mass extinction of plants and animals.
Exceeding this threshold will lead to the sixth mass extinction of species on Earth, LIFE said, quoted by BTA.
News of a sixth mass extinction makes for frightening reading.
The availability of such broad literature dealing with different episodes of mass extinction supports its importance and interest among the paleontologists and other geoscientists.
Scientists are increasingly convinced that the world is barrelling towards a "sixth mass extinction" event.
When Life Nearly Died: The Greatest Mass Extinction of All Time, Revised Edition
Based on studies, scientists believe that our planet has been rocked by at least five big mass extinction events, though many more smaller scale extinctions have occurred that show up in fossil records.
ISLAMABAD -- The world is embarking on its sixth mass extinction with animals disappearing about 100 times faster than they used to, scientists warned on Friday, and humans could be among the first victims.
The amount of carbon added to the atmosphere that triggered the mass extinction was probably greater than today's fossil fuel reserves, according to the study coordinated by the University of Edinburgh.