master's degree

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master's degree

n.
An academic degree conferred by a college or university upon those who complete at least one year of prescribed study beyond the bachelor's degree.

master's degree

or

master's

n
(Education) education (often capital) a university degree such as an MA or an MSc which is of a higher level than a first degree and usually takes one or two years to complete

mas′ter's degree`


n.
a degree awarded by a graduate school, usu. after the completion of at least one year of graduate studies.

master's degree

An academic degree awarded by a college or university to someone who has studied a subject for at least one year beyond the bachelor’s degree.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.master's degree - an academic degree higher than a bachelor's degree but lower than a doctor's degreemaster's degree - an academic degree higher than a bachelor's degree but lower than a doctor's degree
academic degree, degree - an award conferred by a college or university signifying that the recipient has satisfactorily completed a course of study; "he earned his degree at Princeton summa cum laude"
Master of Architecture, MArch - a degree granted for the successful completion of advanced study of architecture
Artium Magister, Master of Arts, AM, MA - a master's degree in arts and sciences
MALS, Master of Arts in Library Science - a master's degree in library science
Master of Arts in Teaching, MAT - a master's degree in teaching
Master in Business, Master in Business Administration, MBA - a master's degree in business
Master of Divinity, MDiv - a master's degree in religion
Master of Education, MEd - a master's degree in education
Master of Fine Arts, MFA - a master's degree in fine arts
Master of Literature, MLitt - a master's degree in literature
Master of Library Science, MLS - a master's degree in library science
Master in Public Affairs - a master's degree in questions of public concern
Master of Science, MSc, SM, MS - a master's degree in science
Master of Science in Engineering - a master's degree in engineering
Master of Theology, ThM - a master's degree in theology
References in classic literature ?
Taking his master's degree after seven years at Cambridge, in 1587, he followed the other 'university wits' to London.
The Commission for University Education had given the lecturers with only master's degrees till last November last year to have upgraded to doctorate level.
Chaddock received a bachelor's, master's degrees and a Ph.D.
All my colleagues, for instance, either have master's degrees or are pursuing one besides taking various short courses on the side.
Nearly 30 per cent of legislators hold a Bachelor's and 18 per cent Master's degrees.
She received her bachelor's degree at Long Island University, Brookville, New York and her master's degrees at U.S.
While I recognize there are factors beyond education involved in determining what a minister is paid, the math indicates the stipend grid of the PCC is in line with what persons with Master's degrees earn in Canada.
More master's degrees were awarded in business than in any other field, during 2012-13.
This report presents data from the 2008 National Survey of Recent College Graduates (NSRCG) on the characteristics of men and women who received bachelor's or master's degrees in science, engineering, or health fields from U.S.
AT & L workers who meet Webster's admission criteria will be able to take online graduate classes that meet the academic requirements for the master's degrees in business administration; business and organizational security management; procurement and acquisitions; management and leadership; media communications; and human resources management.
Harvey Zimmermann found himself back on campus at the University of North Texas, where he had earned his bachelor's and master's degrees.
Lynn Singleton, an independent music teacher from Columbus, Ohio, attended Bowling Green State University, where she received bachelor's and master's degrees in performance.

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