Masters


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Related to Masters: Masters Degree

mas·ter

 (măs′tər)
n.
1. One that has control over another person, a group of persons, or a thing, especially:
a. The owner or keeper of an animal: The dog ran toward its master.
b. The owner of a slave.
c. One who has control over or ownership of something: the master of a large tea plantation.
d. An employer.
e. The man who serves as the head of a household.
f. One who defeats another; a victor: I had to admit that I had met my master and so conceded the game.
g. One who acts out the role of the dominating partner in a sadomasochistic relationship.
2. The captain of a merchant ship. Also called master mariner.
3.
a. One whose teachings or doctrines are accepted by followers.
b. Master Christianity Jesus.
4. A male teacher, schoolmaster, or tutor.
5. One who holds a master's degree.
6.
a. An artist or performer of great and exemplary skill.
b. An old master.
7. A worker qualified to teach apprentices and carry on the craft independently.
8. An expert: a master of three languages.
9. Abbr. M.
a. Used formerly as a title for a man holding a naval office ranking next below a lieutenant on a warship.
b. Used as a title for a man who serves as the head or presiding officer of certain societies, clubs, orders, or institutions.
c. Master Used as a title for any of various male officers having specified duties concerning the management of the British royal household.
d. Master Used as a courtesy title before the given or full name of a boy not considered old enough to be addressed as Mister.
e. Archaic Used as a form of address for a man; mister.
10. One who is appointed to assist a court in the performance of certain legal functions, such as the taking of testimony and calculating damages in complex litigation. Also called special master.
11. Master A man who owns a pack of hounds or is the chief officer of a hunt.
12. An original, such as an original document or audio recording, from which copies can be made.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a master.
2. Principal or predominant: a master plot.
3. Controlling all other parts of a mechanism: a master switch.
4. Highly skilled or proficient: a master thief.
5. Being an original from which copies are made.
tr.v. mas·tered, mas·ter·ing, mas·ters
1. To become very skilled in or knowledgeable about: mastered the language in a year's study.
2. To overcome or defeat: He finally mastered his addiction to drugs.
3. To produce a master copy of (an audio or video recording, for example).

[Middle English maister, master, from Old English māgister, mægister and Old French maistre, both from Latin magister; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

mas′ter·dom n.

Mas·ters

 (măs′tərz), Edgar Lee 1869-1950.
American poet known for his Spoon River Anthology (1915), a collection of free-verse epitaphs of the citizens of a small Midwestern town.

Masters

, William Howell 1915-2001.
American physician. He and his wife Virginia E. Johnson did pioneering research on human sexual behavior and established a sex therapy institute. The couples' publications include Human Sexual Response (1966).

Masters

(ˈmɑːstəz)
n
(Biography) Edgar Lee. 1868–1950, US poet; best known for Spoon River Anthology (1915)

Mas•ters

(ˈmæs tərz, ˈmɑ stərz)

n.
Edgar Lee, 1869–1950, U.S. author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Masters - United States poet (1869-1950)Masters - United States poet (1869-1950)  
References in classic literature ?
In his own mind he planned to go to Paris and to finish his art education among the masters there, but that never turned out.
Say not so," cried Duncan; "we are yet masters of the fort, and of our honor.
Without demanding a surrender, they furiously assaulted the garrison, which was happily prepared to oppose them; and, after they had expended much ammunition in vain, and killed the cattle round the fort, not being likely to make themselves masters of this place, they raised the siege, and departed in the morning of the third day after they came, with the loss of about thirty killed, and the number of wounded uncertain.
How unlike alas the hangdog look of a republican official, who, as the servant of the people, feels himself less than the least, and below the lowest of his masters.
You've never mentioned to me one of your masters, one of your comrades, nor the least little thing that ever happened to you at school.
While their masters, the mates, seemed afraid of the sound of the hinges of their own jaws, the harpooneers chewed their food with such a relish that there was a report to it.
He had no wit to trace back the social crime to its far sources-- he could not say that it was the thing men have called "the system" that was crushing him to the earth that it was the packers, his masters, who had bought up the law of the land, and had dealt out their brutal will to him from the seat of justice.
Whoever visits some estates there, and witnesses the good-humored indulgence of some masters and mistresses, and the affectionate loyalty of some slaves, might be tempted to dream the oft-fabled poetic legend of a patriarchal institution, and all that; but over and above the scene there broods a portentous shadow--the shadow of law.
Her mistress was a captive in a vast and gloomy castle, along with forty-four other young and beautiful girls, pretty much all of them princesses; they had been languishing in that cruel captivity for twenty-six years; the masters of the castle were three stupendous brothers, each with four arms and one eye -- the eye in the center of the forehead, and as big as a fruit.
She said that this composer had made a complete revolution in music and was burying the old masters one by one.
They realized that for once in their lives they were hearing masters.
The effect of a religious profession on the conduct of southern masters is vividly described in the fol- lowing Narrative, and shown to be any thing but salutary.

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