Masters


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Related to Masters: Masters Degree

mas·ter

 (măs′tər)
n.
1. One that has control over another person, a group of persons, or a thing, especially:
a. The owner or keeper of an animal: The dog ran toward its master.
b. The owner of a slave.
c. One who has control over or ownership of something: the master of a large tea plantation.
d. An employer.
e. The man who serves as the head of a household.
f. One who defeats another; a victor: I had to admit that I had met my master and so conceded the game.
g. One who acts out the role of the dominating partner in a sadomasochistic relationship.
2. The captain of a merchant ship. Also called master mariner.
3.
a. One whose teachings or doctrines are accepted by followers.
b. Master Christianity Jesus.
4. A male teacher, schoolmaster, or tutor.
5. One who holds a master's degree.
6.
a. An artist or performer of great and exemplary skill.
b. An old master.
7. A worker qualified to teach apprentices and carry on the craft independently.
8. An expert: a master of three languages.
9. Abbr. M.
a. Used formerly as a title for a man holding a naval office ranking next below a lieutenant on a warship.
b. Used as a title for a man who serves as the head or presiding officer of certain societies, clubs, orders, or institutions.
c. Master Used as a title for any of various male officers having specified duties concerning the management of the British royal household.
d. Master Used as a courtesy title before the given or full name of a boy not considered old enough to be addressed as Mister.
e. Archaic Used as a form of address for a man; mister.
10. One who is appointed to assist a court in the performance of certain legal functions, such as the taking of testimony and calculating damages in complex litigation. Also called special master.
11. Master A man who owns a pack of hounds or is the chief officer of a hunt.
12. An original, such as an original document or audio recording, from which copies can be made.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a master.
2. Principal or predominant: a master plot.
3. Controlling all other parts of a mechanism: a master switch.
4. Highly skilled or proficient: a master thief.
5. Being an original from which copies are made.
tr.v. mas·tered, mas·ter·ing, mas·ters
1. To become very skilled in or knowledgeable about: mastered the language in a year's study.
2. To overcome or defeat: He finally mastered his addiction to drugs.
3. To produce a master copy of (an audio or video recording, for example).

[Middle English maister, master, from Old English māgister, mægister and Old French maistre, both from Latin magister; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

mas′ter·dom n.

Mas·ters

 (măs′tərz), Edgar Lee 1869-1950.
American poet known for his Spoon River Anthology (1915), a collection of free-verse epitaphs of the citizens of a small Midwestern town.

Masters

, William Howell 1915-2001.
American physician. He and his wife Virginia E. Johnson did pioneering research on human sexual behavior and established a sex therapy institute. The couples' publications include Human Sexual Response (1966).

Masters

(ˈmɑːstəz)
n
(Biography) Edgar Lee. 1868–1950, US poet; best known for Spoon River Anthology (1915)

Mas•ters

(ˈmæs tərz, ˈmɑ stərz)

n.
Edgar Lee, 1869–1950, U.S. author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Masters - United States poet (1869-1950)Masters - United States poet (1869-1950)  
References in classic literature ?
And certainly it is the nature of extreme self-lovers, as they will set an house on fire, and it were but to roast their eggs; and yet these men many times hold credit with their masters, because their study is but to please them, and profit themselves; and for either respect, they will abandon the good of their affairs.
To you four, sirs,'' replied the Knight, addressing those who had last spoken, ``and to your honourable and valiant masters, I have one common reply.
By far the larger part of the slaves know as little of their ages as horses know of theirs, and it is the wish of most masters within my knowledge to keep their slaves thus ignorant.
A year passed, and when Philip came to the school the old masters were all in their places; but a good many changes had taken place notwithstanding their stubborn resistance, none the less formidable because it was concealed under an apparent desire to fall in with the new head's ideas.
This old gentleman came from London in 1637, and had been teaching school ever since; so that there were now aged men, grandfathers like myself, to whom Master Cheever had taught their alphabet.
It came to pass that the master one day said to her: 'Gretel, there is a guest coming this evening; prepare me two fowls very daintily.
He had made the latter a sign to seat himself on a stool near the door, and, after several moments of a silence which appeared to be a continuation of a preceding meditation, he said to him in a rather patronizing way, "Good day, Master Jacques.
I was thought very handsome; my master would not sell me till I was four years old; he said lads ought not to work like men, and colts ought not to work like horses till they were quite grown up.
As never before, he felt his dependence on the love- master, close at whose heels he followed, no matter what happened never losing sight of him.
Don Quixote at once asked the landlord what this Master Pedro was, and what was the show and what was the ape he had with him; which the landlord replied, "This is a famous puppet-showman, who for some time past has been going about this Mancha de Aragon, exhibiting a show of the release of Melisendra by the famous Don Gaiferos, one of the best and best-represented stories that have been seen in this part of the kingdom for many a year; he has also with him an ape with the most extraordinary gift ever seen in an ape or imagined in a human being; for if you ask him anything, he listens attentively to the question, and then jumps on his master's shoulder, and pressing close to his ear tells him the answer which Master Pedro then delivers.
The master is not so called from his knowing how to manage his slave, but because he is so; for the same reason a slave and a freeman have their respective appellations.
It now began to be known and talked of in the neighbourhood, that my master had found a strange animal in the field, about the bigness of a SPLACNUCK, but exactly shaped in every part like a human creature; which it likewise imitated in all its actions; seemed to speak in a little language of its own, had already learned several words of theirs, went erect upon two legs, was tame and gentle, would come when it was called, do whatever it was bid, had the finest limbs in the world, and a complexion fairer than a nobleman's daughter of three years old.

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