theorem

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the·o·rem

 (thē′ər-əm, thîr′əm)
n.
1. An idea that has been demonstrated as true or is assumed to be so demonstrable.
2. Mathematics A proposition that has been or is to be proved on the basis of explicit assumptions.

[Late Latin theōrēma, from Greek, from theōrein, to look at, from theōros, spectator; see theory.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

theorem

(ˈθɪərəm)
n
(Logic) maths logic a statement or formula that can be deduced from the axioms of a formal system by means of its rules of inference
[C16: from Late Latin theōrēma, from Greek: something to be viewed, from theōrein to view]
theorematic, theoremic, theorematical adj
ˌtheoreˈmatically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

the•o•rem

(ˈθi ər əm, ˈθɪər əm)

n.
1. Math. a theoretical proposition, statement, or formula embodying something to be proved from other propositions or formulas.
2. a rule or law, esp. one expressed by an equation or formula.
3. Logic. a proposition that can be deduced from the premises or assumptions of a system.
4. an idea, method, or statement generally accepted as true or worthwhile without proof.
[1545–55; < Late Latin theōrēma < Greek theṓrēma spectacle, object of contemplation, theorem =theōrē-, variant s. of theōreîn to observe, derivative of theōrós person sent to consult an oracle, spectator + -ma resultative n. suffix]
the`o•re•mat′ic (-əˈmæt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

the·o·rem

(thē′ər-əm, thîr′əm)
A mathematical statement whose truth can be proved on the basis of a given set of axioms or assumptions.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theorem - a proposition deducible from basic postulatestheorem - a proposition deducible from basic postulates
binomial theorem - a theorem giving the expansion of a binomial raised to a given power
proposition - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false
2.theorem - an idea accepted as a demonstrable truth
idea, thought - the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
Bayes' theorem - (statistics) a theorem describing how the conditional probability of a set of possible causes for a given observed event can be computed from knowledge of the probability of each cause and the conditional probability of the outcome of each cause
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

theorem

noun proposition, statement, formula, rule, principle, thesis, hypothesis, deduction, dictum He postulated a theorem and proved it.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

theorem

noun
A broad and basic rule or truth:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
نَظَرِيَّه
teorém
læresætning
elméleti tétel
setning
teorema
teorēma
teoréma
davateorem

theorem

[ˈθɪərəm] N (Math) → teorema m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

theorem

[ˈθiːərəm] nthéorème m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

theorem

nSatz m (also Math), → Theorem nt (geh, spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

theorem

[ˈθɪərəm] n (Math) → teorema m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

theorem

(ˈθiərəm) noun
especially in mathematics, something that has been or must be proved to be true by careful reasoning. a geometrical theorem.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
From this point on, a discussion was held concerning the importance of finding several methods of solution of the same task, the fact that in each mathematical theorem, and especially in Euclidean geometry, there is a single property for several properties that are conserved.
Whereas there are canonical examples of scientific explanations (as well as canonical examples of nonexplanations, such as "the flagpole," "the eclipse," and "the barometer"), there are few (if any) examples that have become widely accepted as exhibiting the distinction between mathematical proofs that explain why some mathematical theorem holds and proofs that merely prove that the theorem holds without revealing the reason why it holds.
Fearing she might share his fate, she shies away from human contact, until one of her father's former students uncovers an unknown mathematical theorem that instigates a change in both their lives.
A MATHEMATICAL theorem states that an infinite number of monkeys armed with typewriters could, if given an infinite amount of time, come up with the complete works of Shakespeare, or maybe it was the Mabinogion.
* Danica McKellar (Winnie Cooper on The Wonder Years) contributed to the Chayes-McKellar-Winn mathematical theorem.
Whose famous mathematical theorem relates to the properties of a right-angled triangle?
It is possibly the simplest important mathematical theorem and as such it deserves to be understood by all students of mathematics.