Matsuo Basho


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Matsuo Basho

(ˈmætzuːəʊ bɑːˈʃɔː)
n
(Biography) See Basho
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The famous haiku master Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) is generally acknowledged to have looked to Chinese poetry for inspiration, especially the poetry of Li Po (701-762) and Du Fu (712-770).
Elena Passarello, Let Me Clear My Throat: Essays (Sarabande Books, 2012) "Walkman," by Michael Robbins, online at theparisreview.org (Issue 218, Fall 2016) and the playlist concluding Robbins's Equipment for Living: On Poetry and Pop Music (Simon 8c Schuster 2017), which mixes Matsuo Basho, Beyonce, Gwendolyn Brooks, and the Beastie Boys.
Hakutani dwells on the Japanese haiku's depiction of nature rather than emotion and treats in considerable detail parallels between some of Pound's poems, especially "In a Station of the Metro," and haikus by Fujiwara Sadaiye, Matsuo Basho, and Arakida Moritake (the last of whom is mentioned by Pound in "Vorticism").
I was struck by a line from the 17th century poet Matsuo Basho: "A field of cotton - as if the moon had flowered."
He quotes the Japanese poet Matsuo Basho: "Every day is a journey and the journey itself home."
Yosa Buson (1716-1783), Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) and Kobayashi Issa are among the most popular haiku masters.
Its subjects are predominantly nature and life experiences, moreover, Yosa Buson (1716-1783), Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) and Kobayashi Issa are among the most popular haiku masters.
Composed by Matsuo Basho (1644-1694), arguably the most famous master of the genre, It is perhaps the most well known of all haiku, and, without message, meaning, or metaphor, it frames a moment that invites our attention.
Matsuo Basho (1644-1694), the lauded Haiku poet, penned the most celebrated Haiku of all: