matter of fact

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matter of fact

n
1. a fact that is undeniably true
2. (Law) law a statement of facts the truth of which the court must determine on the basis of the evidence before it. Compare matter of law
3. (Philosophy) philosophy a proposition that is amenable to empirical testing, as contrasted with the truths of logic or mathematics
4. as a matter of fact actually; in fact
adj
unimaginative or emotionless: he gave a matter-of-fact account of the murder.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.matter of fact - a disputed factual contention that is generally left for a jury to decidematter of fact - a disputed factual contention that is generally left for a jury to decide
question, head - the subject matter at issue; "the question of disease merits serious discussion"; "under the head of minor Roman poets"
2.matter of fact - a matter that is an actual fact or is demonstrable as a fact
fact - a piece of information about circumstances that exist or events that have occurred; "first you must collect all the facts of the case"
References in classic literature ?
The propriety of this appellate jurisdiction has been scarcely called in question in regard to matters of law; but the clamors have been loud against it as applied to matters of fact. Some well-intentioned men in this State, deriving their notions from the language and forms which obtain in our courts, have been induced to consider it as an implied supersedure of the trial by jury, in favor of the civil-law mode of trial, which prevails in our courts of admiralty, probate, and chancery.
It is therefore necessary that the appellate jurisdiction should, in certain cases, extend in the broadest sense to matters of fact. It will not answer to make an express exception of cases which shall have been originally tried by a jury, because in the courts of some of the States all causes are tried in this mode[4]; and such an exception would preclude the revision of matters of fact, as well where it might be proper, as where it might be improper.
But whether any person is such by nature, and whether it is advantageous and just for any one to be a slave or no, or whether all slavery is contrary to nature, shall be considered hereafter; not that it is difficult to determine it upon general principles, or to understand it from matters of fact; for that some should govern, and others be governed, is not only necessary but useful, and from the hour of their birth some are marked out for those purposes, and others for the other, and there are many species of both sorts.