halo effect

(redirected from Matthew effect)
Also found in: Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

halo effect

n.
An effect whereby the perception of positive qualities in one thing or part gives rise to the perception of similar qualities in related things or in the whole: "Congenial surroundings or service at a restaurant can sometimes create a halo effect for the food" (M.H. Reed).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

halo effect

n
1. (Psychology) See horns and halo effect
2. (Commerce) the beneficial effect on sales of a company's range of products produced by the popularity or high profile of one particular product
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ha′lo effect`


n.
a potential inaccuracy in estimation or judgment, esp. of a person, due to a tendency to overgeneralize from a single salient feature or action, usu. in a favorable direction.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shahid Siddiqui , an educationist and a Dean of Social Sciences, NUML at Islamabad also delivered a keynote address on ' language , life chances and the Matthew effect'.
Shahid Siddiqui, an educationist and a Dean of Social Sciences, NUML at Islamabad also delivered a keynote address on ' language , life chances and the Matthew effect'.
This eventually results in the Matthew Effect coined by Robert K.
The gap between developed and developing economies is widening, and we see the emergence of a Matthew effect where digitally advanced economies produce greater returns on their infrastructure than less-developed economies.
In 2017, the GCI identified a trend of growing inequality it termed the Matthew Effect, wherein Frontrunners see ICT infrastructure investment benefits compound over time to position them as unassailable leaders.
Huawei believes the development of technologies, societies are experiencing a tangible Matthew Effect when it comes to innovation.
This unjust disparity in reading education promotes the Matthew Effect where the rich get richer and the poor get poorer (Stanovich, 1986).
The great sociologist of science Robert Merton noted that often a Matthew effect arose in that those scientists who had the better reputation upon entering a collaboration would seem to receive a disproportionate share of the benefits from collaborative output.
Merton to describe the phenomenon of advantage resulting in further advantage and disadvantage, which yields continued circumstances described as The Matthew Effect. In the book, The Matthew Effect: How Advantage Begets Further Advantage, author Daniel Rigney explains:
Previous studies on the dynamic changes in learning achievement have found that there is an obvious phenomenon of the strong getting stronger and the weak getting weaker, known as the Matthew effect in learning performance (Bodovski & Farkas, 2007; McNamara, Scissons & Dahleu, 2005; Pfost, Dorfler & Artelt, 2012).
While large developers have been hurt, the situation is even worse for the smaller ones as the Matthew effect of the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer is gradually becoming evident.