Maurist


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Maurist

(ˈməʊrɪst)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a member of a congregation of French Benedictine monks founded in 1621 and noted for its scholarly work
[C19: named after St Maurus, 6th-century disciple of St Benedict]
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1793, the Maurist monks were forced to leave their tidal island home, which was renamed "Mont Libre," or Free Mountain, and the abbey became a prison.
Finally, Robert Irwin relates the fascinating history of attempts to gather, translate, publish, and use Arabic sources for the crusades from the Maurist monks of the seventeenth century to the present day.
Christian scholars, especially those of the Bollandist and Maurist congregations, adopted the philological approach to the study of religious texts, historicizing them much like Asian evidential scholars later did with Confucian Classics.
On the vigil of Pentecost the expected psalms were 117 and 140 (M 20-21) as in Sermo 29 in the Maurist edition.
nec nisi rerum ignorantia possit errari." Sancti Augustini, Enchiridion ad Laurentium, sive de fide, spe et charitate, in Opera Omnia (Paris: Apud Gaume Fratres, Maurist edition, 1837), 6:352; St.
In eight lucid chapters she argues that, despite the revolutionary drama, the Maurist monks remained faithful to their vocations.
Maurist discoveries resulted in a diachronic self-awareness of Roman Catholicism that what had been taken as timeless were historical developments of regional piety.
One of the first complete editions was prepared by none other than Erasmus in 1516-20, and another edition of significance was that of the energetic Maurist Jean Martianay (1693-1706).
(3) Most of Guibert's works are printed in Patrologia latina 156 (1853), which reproduces the editio princeps by the Maurist Benedictine Dom Luc D'Achery (1651); for manuscript studies, see M.-C.
16) includes the Venice edition, 1537, and the Maurist edition, Paris 1705, but not the Lyons edition, 1539-40.
German Benedictines established major historical-critical projects (inspired by the French Maurists), participated in learned societies, contributed to (and in some cases founded) academic journals, conducted scientific experiments, expressed disdain for Scholasticism and enthusiasm for the ideas of Locke, Wolff, and Kant, and embarked on theological experiments in ecumenism (Beda Mayr) and religious toleration (Benedict Werkmeister).
(7.) Johannes van Oort, "John Calvin and the Church Fathers," in The Reception of the Church Fathers in the West: From the Carolingians to the Maurists, ed.