Maurya

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Maurya

(ˈmaʊrjə)
n
(Historical Terms) a dynasty (?321–?185 bc) that united most of the Indian subcontinent and presided over a great flowering of Indian civilization
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For some time, Kashmir was a part of Mauryan emperor Ashoka's Buddhist empire.
Some of the exclusive exhibits showcased in the gallery are Bronze sculptures of Parvati and Sridevi of Chola Period (brought back in 2016), Standing Buddha (returned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the year 1999), terracotta Mother Goddess of Mauryan period (brought back in the year 2016), Brahma-Brahmani (confiscated by Central Bureau of Investigation), Mithuna (seized in New York and brought back in the year 2010) and Kashmiri Harwan tile (returned to India by Consulate General of India, New York in the year 2016).
In an earlier age, the Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, it is well known, emplaced inscriptions from Kandahar to Karnataka to exhort people to coexist peacefully, suggesting a fear of conflict on the basis of religious and cultural identities.
Most often, when Buddhadasa discussed righteous rule he referred to the Buddha and the Mauryan king Asoka who spread Buddhism in India, and the ten qualities of kingship whereby an autocrat governed righteously.
According to Imran Shaukat Buddhism flourished in what is now Pakistan some 2,300 years ago, when the region was the centre of a Buddhist civilisation that took root under the rule of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka, leaving an abundant archaeological legacy of art and architecture.
Explorers, researchers, theologians and politicians have long puzzled over the whereabouts of Suvarnabhumi, with references dating back to the Jataka tales of the life of the Buddha, and ancient Buddhist accounts from the time of the Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, who ruled over much of the Indian subcontinent in the third century BC.
Here, we collected data on the institutions of three ancient empires/kingdoms: the Mauryan Empire (322 BCE-185 BCE) that covered mostly Northern India but expanded most to the South under Emperor Ashoka; the Bengal Kingdom that straddled current Bangladesh and current West Bengal in India, as well as the Tamil kingdoms.
The most ancient religious symbols of Yoni-Lingam engraved near the variant Indus script provides evidence that the script was common here before the dominance or rule of Mauryan, Rai and Brahman dynasties.
Alexander was next to place his mark on the region, followed by the Mauryan and the Rai Dynasties before Muhammad Bin Qasim conquered the Indus Valley from Sindh to Multan.
He starts the history of irrigation from its beginning, like: Amri, the earliest site of irrigated agriculture, started in 3700 BC.29 There was salabi type rudimentary irrigation in the early and mature Indus valley civilization 3770-2350 and 2350-1650 BC.30 The people during 700-519 BC tried to irrigate more land and they succeeded in it.31 During 519-400BC Achaemenes implemented rules on land and rendered public services.32 During the Mauryan period (321-184 BC), land and irrigation system was improved.
These Relics were originally discovered near the Dharmarajika stupa, the earliest and largest Buddhist complex at Taxila, Pakistan which was built in the 3rd century BC in order to house the Holy Relics of the Lord Buddha by the famous Mauryan king Asoka who was also known as Dharmaraja for his services to Buddhism.