Laue

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Lau·e

 (lou′ə), Max Theodore Felix von 1879-1960.
German physicist who won a 1914 Nobel Prize for demonstrating the diffraction of x-rays by crystals.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Laue

(German ˈlauə)
n
(Biography) Max Theodor Felix von (maks ˈteːodoːr ˈfeːlɪks fɔn). 1879–1960, German physicist. He pioneered the technique of measuring the wavelengths of X-rays by their diffraction by crystals and contributed to the theory of relativity: Nobel prize for physics 1914
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The group, which also included Werner Heisenberg and Max von Laue, were eventually released when the recordings of their chats revealed nothing of use.
Named after Max von Laue, such images provide a photographic record of the diffraction pattern that is produced when an X-ray beam passes through a crystal (Warren, 1969).
Barka: The event 'Crystals, Forbidden Symmetries and Quasi-Crystals' was held at the Qurum Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre, to coincide with the centenary of the Nobel Prize winning physicist Max von Laue. The German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) the Geological Society of Oman (GSO) paid tributes to Von Laue for his revolutionary work on crystals.
The X-rays were well named; it took 15 years of controversy before Max von Laue and the Braggs, by measuring the diffraction patterns of crystals, showed what X-rays are: 'light waves' with about a thousand times shorter wavelength than visible light.
In 1952, in private correspondence with Max von Laue (Liu, 1992), Einstein changed his view and argued that the body would become hotter by a Lorentz factor.
Nevertheless, it was not until 1911 that German physicist Max von Laue generalised it to include all forms of energy.
Augustine also brought back a galaxy of German star scientists, including Hahn, Nobelist Max von Laue, Karl Wirtz, Erich Bagge, and Carl von Weizsacker.