maxim

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Related to Maxims: Proverbs

max·im

 (măk′sĭm)
n.
A succinct formulation of a fundamental principle, general truth, or rule of conduct. See Synonyms at saying.

[Middle English maxime, from Old French, from Medieval Latin maxima, from maxima (prōpositiō), greatest (premise), feminine of Latin maximus, greatest; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

maxim

(ˈmæksɪm)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a brief expression of a general truth, principle, or rule of conduct
[C15: via French from Medieval Latin, from maxima, in the phrase maxima prōpositio basic axiom (literally: greatest proposition); see maximum]

Maxim

(ˈmæksɪm)
n
(Biography) Sir Hiram Stevens. 1840–1916, British inventor of the first automatic machine gun (1884), born in the US
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

max•im

(ˈmæk sɪm)

n.
1. an expression of a general truth or principle, esp. an aphoristic or sententious one.
2. a principle or rule of conduct.
[1400–50; « Medieval Latin maxima < Latin maximus, superlative of magnus, great]
syn: See proverb.

Max•im

(ˈmæk sɪm)

n.
1. Sir Hiram Stevens, 1840–1916, English inventor, born in the U.S.
2. his brother, Hudson, 1853–1927, U.S. inventor.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

maxim

a short, pithy statement that serves as a motto. — maximist, n.
See also: Proverbs
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
aphorism, apophthegm, apothegm - a short pithy instructive saying
gnome - a short pithy saying expressing a general truth
moralism - a moral maxim
2.maxim - English inventor (born in the United States) who invented the Maxim gun that was used in World War I (1840-1916)Maxim - English inventor (born in the United States) who invented the Maxim gun that was used in World War I (1840-1916)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

maxim

noun saying, motto, adage, proverb, rule, saw, gnome, dictum, axiom, aphorism, byword, apophthegm I believe in the maxim 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it'.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

maxim

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
قاعِدَه
aforismusmravní zásadarčení
grundsætningleveregel
spakmæli
maksimasentencija
principssentence
maxima
özdeyişvecize

maxim

[ˈmæksɪm] Nmáxima f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

maxim

[ˈmæksɪm] nmaxime f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

maxim

nMaxime f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

maxim

[ˈmæksɪm] nmassima
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

maxim

(ˈmaksim) noun
a saying, general truth or rule giving a guide to good behaviour. `He who hesitates is lost' is a well-known maxim.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
One of the maxims which the devil, in a late visit upon earth, left to his disciples, is, when once you are got up, to kick the stool from under you.
And finally, as it is not enough, before commencing to rebuild the house in which we live, that it be pulled down, and materials and builders provided, or that we engage in the work ourselves, according to a plan which we have beforehand carefully drawn out, but as it is likewise necessary that we be furnished with some other house in which we may live commodiously during the operations, so that I might not remain irresolute in my actions, while my reason compelled me to suspend my judgement, and that I might not be prevented from living thenceforward in the greatest possible felicity, I formed a provisory code of morals, composed of three or four maxims, with which I am desirous to make you acquainted.
All that kind of policy by which nations anticipate distant danger, and meet the gathering storm, must be abstained from, as contrary to the genuine maxims of a free government.
It dealt in moral and practical maxims, in information on technical subjects which are of service in daily life -- agriculture, astronomy, augury, and the calendar -- in matters of religion and in tracing the genealogies of men.
All people of broad, strong sense have an instinctive repugnance to the men of maxims; because such people early discern that the mysterious complexity of our life is not to be embraced by maxims, and that to lace ourselves up in formulas of that sort is to repress all the divine promptings and inspirations that spring from growing insight and sympathy.
We may believe that this is the case, but if we do, our belief is based upon analogies and general scientific maxims, not upon any foundation of detailed observation.
I shall say nothing of those remote nations where YAHOOS preside; among which the least corrupted are the BROBDINGNAGIANS; whose wise maxims in morality and government it would be our happiness to observe.
"Likewise, Sancho," said Don Quixote, "thou must not mingle such a quantity of proverbs in thy discourse as thou dost; for though proverbs are short maxims, thou dost drag them in so often by the head and shoulders that they savour more of nonsense than of maxims."
One of the principal objections inculcated by the more respectable adversaries to the Constitution, is its supposed violation of the political maxim, that the legislative, executive, and judiciary departments ought to be separate and distinct.
After what has been said, it follows that we should now show what particular form of government is most suitable for particular persons; first laying this down as a general maxim, that that party which desires to support the actual administration of the state ought always to be superior to that which would alter it.
'Tis a maxim tremendous, but trite: And you'd best be unpacking the things that you need To rig yourselves out for the fight."
Meanwhile, he cast his eyes over that unfortunate city, which contained so much deep misery and so many heroic virtues, and recalling the saying of Louis XI, his political predecessor, as he himself was the predecessor of Robespierre, he repeated this maxim of Tristan's gossip: "Divide in order to reign."

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