Mayan language

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Noun1.Mayan language - a family of American Indian languages spoken by MayaMayan language - a family of American Indian languages spoken by Maya
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Kekchi - a Mayan language spoken by the Kekchi
Mam - a Mayan language spoken by the Mam
Yucatec, Yucateco - a Mayan language spoken by the Yucatec
Quiche - the Mayan language spoken by the Quiche
Cakchiquel - the Mayan language spoken by the Cakchiquel
References in periodicals archive ?
He learned both Spanish and Tzutujil, one of the 21 Mayan languages spoken in Guatemala.
This study explores one of the outcomes of GuatemalaAEs Maya Movement of the past 15 years: an interest in writing indigenous Mayan languages and the creation of a new alphabet for the 22 Mayan languages spoken in Guatemala.
Lo indlgena runs through real series of ideas--such as indigenous culture, twenty-two Mayan languages, interculturalism--and actual things--such as cortes and guipiles of Mayan women, handouts of the arboreal history of Mayan languages in a teacher preparation classroom, the Tikal pyramids and their images printed in reading textbooks.
These texts illustrate the Iberian missiological matrix of theological and cultural Roman Catholicism, on the one hand, within which Christianity was transmitted, and on the other hand, the Mexican (Aztec) and Yucatec Mayan languages and worldviews, within which the Christian religion was received and appropriated.
While experts say Tz'utujil is not in danger of extinction, it and other Mayan languages are greatly overshadowed by Spanish in commerce, pop culture and other aspects of daily life.
Partnerships between adolescent programmers and health care organizations providing services in Mayan languages, such as Wuqu' Kawoq, will not only ensure appropriate sexual and reproductive health services are available, but simultaneously build development institutions and supportive environments for Mayan languages and culture.
Given that 22 Mayan languages are spoken in Guatemala as well as Spanish, carrying out a widespread and effective information campaign could prove to be complex and costly.
Authors Matthew Restall and Amara Solari are specialists in colonial Mexican history and Maya culture and between them have more than 30 years of experience in the study of Mayan languages, as well as research into the Maya past in Mexico, Central America, and Spain.
Installation of ATMs using Mayan languages has led to increased banking activities by indigenous populations, reports Prensalibre.com (July 5, 2011).
Having collaborated previously on articles and book chapters about Mayan languages, Robertson (emeritus linguistics), Robbie A.