Maypole

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Related to Maypoles: Maibaum

May·pole

also may·pole  (mā′pōl′)
n.
A pole decorated with streamers that those celebrating May Day hold while dancing.

maypole

(ˈmeɪˌpəʊl)
n
a tall pole fixed upright in an open space during May-Day celebrations, around which people dance holding streamers attached at its head

May•pole

(ˈmeɪˌpoʊl)

n. (often l.c.)
a pole, decorated with flowers and ribbons, around which people dance on May Day.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Maypole - a vertical pole or post decorated with streamers that can be held by dancers celebrating May Daymaypole - a vertical pole or post decorated with streamers that can be held by dancers celebrating May Day
post - an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position; "he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them"
Translations
májka
majstang
májusfa
maístöng
fırdöndümayıs/bahar direği

maypole

[ˈmeɪpəʊl] Nmayo m

maypole

[ˈmeɪpəʊl] nmât m enrubanné (autour duquel on danse)

May

(mei) noun
the fifth month of the year, the month following April.
May Day
the first day of May, an especially socialist holiday or festival in many countries.
ˈmaypole noun
a decorated pole for dancing round on May Day.
References in classic literature ?
In the year 1775, there stood upon the borders of Epping Forest, at a distance of about twelve miles from London--measuring from the Standard in Cornhill,' or rather from the spot on or near to which the Standard used to be in days of yore--a house of public entertainment called the Maypole; which fact was demonstrated to all such travellers as could neither read nor write (and at that time a vast number both of travellers and stay-at-homes were in this condition) by the emblem reared on the roadside over against the house, which, if not of those goodly proportions that Maypoles were wont to present in olden times, was a fair young ash, thirty feet in height, and straight as any arrow that ever English yeoman drew.
The Maypole--by which term from henceforth is meant the house, and not its sign--the Maypole was an old building, with more gable ends than a lazy man would care to count on a sunny day; huge zig-zag chimneys, out of which it seemed as though even smoke could not choose but come in more than naturally fantastic shapes, imparted to it in its tortuous progress; and vast stables, gloomy, ruinous, and empty.
Whether these, and many other stories of the like nature, were true or untrue, the Maypole was really an old house, a very old house, perhaps as old as it claimed to be, and perhaps older, which will sometimes happen with houses of an uncertain, as with ladies of a certain, age.
The evening with which we have to do, was neither a summer nor an autumn one, but the twilight of a day in March, when the wind howled dismally among the bare branches of the trees, and rumbling in the wide chimneys and driving the rain against the windows of the Maypole Inn, gave such of its frequenters as chanced to be there at the moment an undeniable reason for prolonging their stay, and caused the landlord to prophesy that the night would certainly clear at eleven o'clock precisely,--which by a remarkable coincidence was the hour at which he always closed his house.
Bright were the days at Merry Mount, when the Maypole was the banner staff of that gay colony
Never had the Maypole been so gayly decked as at sunset on midsummer eve.
Such were the colonists of Merry Mount, as they stood in the broad smile of sunset round their venerated Maypole.
On that day, there was to be a bonfire on the Place de Grève, a maypole at the Chapelle de Braque, and a mystery at the Palais de Justice.
It must be stated, in honor of the good sense of the loungers of Paris, that the greater part of this crowd directed their steps towards the bonfire, which was quite in season, or towards the mystery play, which was to be presented in the grand hall of the Palais de Justice (the courts of law), which was well roofed and walled; and that the curious left the poor, scantily flowered maypole to shiver all alone beneath the sky of January, in the cemetery of the Chapel of Braque.
However, there is a maypole and a bonfire in the town; a mystery, Pope of the Fools, and Flemish ambassadors in the city; and, at the university, nothing
His coat was gathered in at his waist, and was patched with as many colors as there are stripes upon a Maypole in the springtide.
The Maypole dances had been banished, games and laughter were frowned upon.