McJob


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McJob

a low-paying, dead-end job, such as at a fast-food restaurant

Mc·Job

 (mĭk-jŏb′)
n. Slang
A job, usually in the retail or service sector, that is low paying, often temporary, and offers minimal or no benefits or opportunity for promotion.

[Mc(Donald's), trademark of a fast-food restaurant chain (from its mass-produced nature) + job.]

McJob

(məkˈdʒɒb)
n
informal a job that is poorly paid and menial
[C20: a humorous corruption of McDonald's, a major American fast-food enterprise]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Jon Snow got a McJob Kit Harrington believes someone helped him successfully audition for Game Of Thrones - a guy he got into a fight with in McDonald's the night before.
Workers like Josh and Sheila also need it fought on a vision for their future that challenges the McJob culture of insecure work and deep inequality.
A Mcjob is a term which describes a low paid job without prospects, McUniversities are places where the transference of knowledge is secondary to standardisation and students are consumers.
Despite jobs in McDonald's sometimes being the brunt of jokes and the urban slang terminology such as "McJob", Mr Hayman disagrees and says it was the best move he could have made, and cites the development he received from his previous employers as part of the reason for his rapid progression during his time at Dicksons.
manufacturing base now thoroughly destroyed, wages in the American economy's last-resort McJob sectors have been flat for decades.
An online McDonald's budgeting tool set up to help its employees actually highlights the difficulty of living on McJob wages.
In a word like MCJOB we have the pronunciation with [e] between the spoken [m] (represented by M) and the spoken [k] (represented by c).
The most famous of these neologisms is perhaps the only one Coupland didn't invent (90)--"McJob: A low-pay, low-prestige, low-dignity, low-benefit, no-future job in the service sector.
In times of recession, a McJob may not be such a bad prospect - and it's certainly better than no job at all.