functional food

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functional food

functional food

n
(Cookery) a food containing additives which provide extra nutritional value. Also called: nutraceutical

func′tional food`


n.
[1985–90]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Turmeric is a potent medicinal food with healing properties, backed by thousands of scientific studies and peer-reviewed articles.
And cells that help form bone - called osteoblasts - were also more active, according to the US study in the Journal of Medicinal Food.
For max profits, you can focus on the Micro-greens and/or Medicinal food production.
The antioxidant boosting properties of sesame, and especially sesame oil, can have a significant effect on oxidative stress, improving human health, according to a systematic review published in Journal of Medicinal Food.
In a study published in the Spring 2006 issue of the Journal of Medicinal Food, the spice was found to reduce symptoms of depression in animals, possibly because it raised levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine.
This study, published in Journal of Medicinal Food, focused on ovariectomized rats, which experience similar drops in estrogen levels to those women experience as they age.
According to a 2012 study published in The Journal of Medicinal Food, green tea can help you do just that.
Others address the evaluation of natural products against biofilm-mediated bacterial resistance; the clinical effects of caraway; challenges in identifying potential phytotherapies from contemporary biomedical literature; botanicals as medicinal food and their effects against obesity; applications of high-performance liquid chromatography in the analysis of herbal products; the use of Ayurveda in developing safe and effective treatment choices; the discovery and development of lead compounds from natural sources using computational approaches; infrared spectroscopic technologies for quality control; the extraction, isolation, identification, and bioassay of antimicrobial secondary metabolites; and data on the uses of herbal medicines in cardiac diseases.
The results of a crossover trial reported in the Journal of Medicinal Food revealed that supplementing with selenium can reduce chemotherapy side effects, including nausea and fatigue.
In a review of studies on nutrition and celiac disease published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, researchers said that a gluten-free diet "seems to increase the risk of overweight or obesity.
The consequence would likely be on the understory medicinal plants which may result in challenges for the security of medicinal food in the world's poorest areas.