Medieval Greek


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Medieval Greek

n.
The Greek language as used from about 800 to about 1500.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Medieval Greek

n
(Languages) the Greek language from the 7th century ad to shortly after the sacking of Constantinople in 1204. Also called: Middle Greek or Byzantine Greek Compare Koine, Late Greek, Ancient Greek
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Me′die′val Greek′


n.
the Greek language of c700–c1500. Abbr.: MGk
Also called Middle Greek.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Medieval Greek - the Greek language from about 600 to 1200 ADMedieval Greek - the Greek language from about 600 to 1200 AD
Greek, Hellenic, Hellenic language - the Hellenic branch of the Indo-European family of languages
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dusan Popovic contributes 'Discontinuity and Continuity of Byzantine Literary Tradition after the Crusaders' Capture of Constantinople: The Case of "Original" Byzantine Romances', and offers comparisons with medieval Greek romances since the Hellenic period.
Ta-lis-muh, derived via French or Spanish from Arabic tilsam, from Medieval Greek telesma.
Medievalists from Europe, North America, and Israel first address concepts and approaches--the impact of the oral theory on medieval studies, the interplay of orality and literacy, questions of performance and performers, oral poetics, and orality and ritual--then traditions and genres: Older Germanic poetry, medieval German literature, drama, the ballad, the epic and lyric, Middle English romance, the Old French chansons de geste, the Italian cantari, Romanian epic songs, Hispanic epic and ballad, medieval Greek and Russian epic, Arabic epic narrative, Persian and Turkish epic and romance, medieval Hebrew traditions, Irish narrative, woman's songs, the pastourelle, popular song, and Andalusi-Arabic strophic poetry.
The name refers to the medieval Greek concept of the Roman oikoumene (inhabited world), which embraced Rome and western Europe as well as the "New Rome," Constantinople, and the Byzantine Empire with its Balkin Slavic commonwealth.