Megarian


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Related to Megarian: Megarian school of philosophy

Me`ga´ri`an


a.1.Belonging, or pertaining, to Megara, a city of ancient Greece.
Megarian school
a school of philosophy established at Megara, after the death of Socrates, by his disciples, and remarkable for its logical subtlety.
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The claim to Comedy is put forward by the Megarians,--not only by those of Greece proper, who allege that it originated under their democracy, but also by the Megarians of Sicily, for the poet Epicharmus, who is much earlier than Chionides and Magnes, belonged to that country.
(Parmenides.) In the Sophist the theory of ideas is spoken of as a doctrine held not by Plato, but by another sect of philosophers, called 'the Friends of Ideas,' probably the Megarians, who were very distinct from him, if not opposed to him (Sophist).
In doing so in the Metaphysics, he argues against the strong Parmenidian vision of the world defended by the Megarian school, which denied all change and motion.
These are some of the reasons why Diodorus (and his Megarian predecessors) concluded that possibilities that never occur or capacities that never produce anything are simply nothing.
Dicaeopolis, comically misunderstanding the fasting Megarian, states that feasting is nice if there is aulos music too ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]: Aristophanes, Ach.
Abstract: This paper purports to clarify the general features of Megarian metaphysics against two traditional interpretations which ascribe to this philosophical group either the defense of a numerical monism or a theory of Forms.
The allusions in vv.1167-1170 to Echinous, the Malian Gulf and 'the Megarian Legs' reflect a similar ambiguity.
This explains why lifting the siege of Potidaea and repealing the Megarian decree, which denied the Megarians the ability to trade with the Delian League, were part of the Spartan ultimatums and pretexts for war (1.139).
An early example from classical Greece is the Megarian Decree, under which Athens introduced a trade embargo on Megara merchants during the Pericles era.
For instance, he points out the difficulty of finding an appropriate equivalent in the target language for a substandard dialect in the source language, and speaks highly of Rogers' treatment of the Megarian farmer's speech in his translation of The Acharnians.
The hemispherical moldmade relief bowl, familiarly known as the "Megarian" bowl, is one of the most useful ceramic dating tools of the Hellenistic period.
After all, if Sparta ignored the pretexts of Corinthian and Megarian grievances, the sheer dynamism of Pericles' imperial culture--majestic buildings, drama, comedy, intellectual fervor, an immense fleet, radical democratic government, an expanding population, and a growing overseas empire--would eventually spread throughout the Peloponnese and offer incentives to Sparta's friends that she could not hope to match.