megaquake

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megaquake

(ˈmɛɡəˌkweɪk)
n
(Geological Science) an earthquake of exceptional destructive power, esp one with a magnitude of 8 or greater, which may generate a tsunami. Also called (in full): megathrust earthquake
[from mega- + (earth)quake]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, which had waves as high as 30 metres and killed nearly a quarter of a million people from Indonesia to South Africa, resulted from a 9.1-magnitude megathrust earthquake in Sumatra.
That means, given our severe limitations in predicting seismic activity, scientists can only say "there is about a 40 percent chance that a megathrust earthquake of 9.0+ magnitude in this fault zone will occur in the next 50 years."
Just a few months prior to Hurricane Katrina, on December 26, 2004, an undersea megathrust earthquake triggered a series of devastating tsunamis along the bordering coasts of the Indian Ocean.
The linear function is not suitable for the analysis of time series data obtained after a megathrust earthquake. The time series of the VAAN station can be characterized with a logarithmic relaxation function (Figure 10).
a 40 percent chance that a megathrust earthquake of 9.0-plus magnitude in this fault will occur in the next 50 years." It also states a potential for a tsunami of up to 100 feet as a result of that earthquake.
(17) The significantly longer interval than for the coral uplift-defined earthquakes in central Sumatra may simply show that not every big megathrust earthquake necessarily generates a tsunami in mainland Sumatra, or it may suggest a different rhythm in the northern Aceh-Andaman sector.
The undersea megathrust earthquake was caused when the Indian Plate was subducted by the Burma Plate and triggered a series of devastating tsunamis along the coasts of most landmasses bordering the Indian Ocean, killing 230,000 people in 14 countries, and inundating coastal communities with waves up to 30 metres (100 ft) high It was one of the deadliest natural disasters in recorded history.
What is now known as the Tohoku undersea megathrust earthquake struck at 2.15pm Japanese time.
Imagine a 9.0-magnitude undersea megathrust earthquake, one of the five largest ever recorded, followed by a 128-foot tsunami that traveled up to six miles inland, followed by a level 7 nuclear accident, in one 24-hour period.
In January 1700, a 9.0-magnitude megathrust earthquake occurred there, sending tsunami waves that crossed the Pacific to Japan and reached as much as 26 feet above sea level onshore in the Pacific Northwest.
But when the Italian house of cards finally does collapse, the shock to world markets will be the financial equivalent of a megathrust earthquake of the sort that recently shook Chile.
Another significant change in this map was incorporation of the hazard associated with the rare (every ~500 years) Cascadia megathrust earthquake on Canada's west coast.