Mekhitarist


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Mekhitarist

a member of an order of Armenian monks, founded in 1715 by Mekhitar da Pietro, dedicated to literary work, especially the perfecting of the Armenian language and the translation into it of the major works of other languages.
See also: Literature
a member of an order of Armenian monks, founded in 1715 by Mekhitar da Pietro, dedicated to literary work, espeeially the perfecting of the Armenian language and the translation into it of the major works of other languages.
See also: Language
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References in periodicals archive ?
This year marks the 300th anniversary of the Armenian Mekhitarist Congregation of San Lazzaro in Venice that was recognized as an academy by Emperor Napoleon.
He then went on to study in Venice at the Catholic Mekhitarist school of Murat-Rafaelian.
The Mekhitarist Order located in San Lazzaro, founded by cleric Mykhitar from Sivas (1676-1749), produced many works in Armenian and other languages, including Ottoman Turkish.
The monument will be erected in the Mekhitarist Congregation's Samuel Murad School.
The Catholic Church, both Roman and Mekhitarist (Armenian Uniate), estimated 120,000 followers.
The first and foremost of these was the Armenian Mekhitarist Order.
President Serzh Sargsyan received today High Representative of Mekhitarist Congregation of Venice, Primate of the Armenian Catholic Archeparchy of Istanbul, Turkey, His Eminence Archbishop Lvon Zkiyan, who arrived in Yerevan to attend the events dedicated to the 300th anniversary of the Mekhitarist Congregation of Saint Lazarus Island, which will be celebrated on October 20-24 in Yerevan.
The Government does not provide official figures for numbers of religious adherents, but congregants offered the following unconfirmed estimates: Catholic, both Roman and Mekhitarist (Armenian Uniate) (120,000); Yezidi, an ethnically Kurdish cultural group whose religion includes elements derived from Zoroastrianism, Islam, and animism (40,000 nominal adherents); unspecified "charismatic" Christian (10,000); Jehovah's Witnesses (8,750); Armenian Evangelical Church (8,000); Molokan, an ethnically Russian pacifist Christian group that split from the Russian Orthodox Church in the 17th century (5,000); Baptist (2,000); the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) (2,000); Greek Orthodox (1,200); Seventh-day Adventist (950); Pentecostal (700); Jewish (600); and Baha'i (200).
The Government does not provide official figures for religious adherents, but congregants offered the following unconfirmed estimates: Catholic, both Roman and Mekhitarist (Armenian Uniate) (180,000); Yezidi, an ethnically Kurdish cultural group whose religion includes elements derived from Zoroastrianism, Islam, and animism (40,000 nominal adherents); unspecified "charismatic" Christian (22,700); Jehovah's Witnesses (8,500); Armenian Evangelical Church (5,000); Baptist (2,000); the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) (2,000); Greek Orthodox (1,200l; Seventh-day Adventist (950); Pentecostal (700); Jewish (500 to 1,000), and Baha'i (more than 200).
The Government does not provide figures for religious adherents, but the congregants themselves offered the following estimates: Yezidi (a Kurdish religious/ ethnic group which includes elements derived from Zoroastrianism, Islam, and animism, with approximately 30,000 to 40,000 nominal adherents); Catholic, both Roman and Mekhitarist (Armenian Uniate) (approximately 180,000); Pentecostal (approximately 25,000); Greek Orthodox (approximately 1,176); Jehovah's Witnesses (approximately 7,500); Armenian Evangelical Church (approximately 5,000); Baptist (approximately 2,000); unspecified "charismatic Christian (approximately 3,000); Seventh-day Adventist (800 to 900); the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) (1,500 to 2,000); Jewish (500 to 1,000), and Baha'i (over 200).
Upon going to study at the College of the Mekhitarists with his brother, the Armenian Genocide in 1915 forced them to stay after graduating.
Armenian Congregation of Mekhitarists, established in 1717 on the island of San Lazzaro in Venice, has long been regarded as one of the Armenian cultural centers.