tea tree

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tea tree

n.
1. A melaleuca tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) of Australia whose leaves yield an oil used in cosmetics and for medicinal purposes.
2. Any of various evergreen shrubs or small trees of the genus Leptospermum, native to Southeast Asia and Australasia, having showy flowers and small needlelike leaves formerly used to make a tealike beverage.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tea tree

n
(Plants) any of various myrtaceous trees of the genus Leptospermum, of Australia and New Zealand, that yield an oil used as an antiseptic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tea′ tree`


n.
a tall shrub or small tree, Leptospermum scoparium, of the myrtle family, native to New Zealand and Australia.
[1750–60; so called from the use of its leaves as an infusion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
Teebaum
References in periodicals archive ?
Tea tree oil, the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia Cheel, has been applied successfully in the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis (Carson et al., 2001) as well as for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on the skin of infected patients.
The application of tea tree oil, the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, for the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis has been reported recently as well as preparations containing lemon balm aqueous extracts (Carson et al., 2001; Wolbling and Leonhardt, 1994).
In this work we highlight a possible synergistic anti-Candida effect between Melaleuca alternifolia, Origanum vulgare and Pelargonium graveolens essential oils and the antifungal compound Amphotericin B.
Banes-Marshall L, Cawley P, Phillips CA (2001) In vitro activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against bacterial and Candida spp.
A fungicidal activity of tea tree oil the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, against dermatophytes and filamentous fungi could be demonstrated recently (Hammer et al.
Carson CF, Riley TV (1995) Antimicrobial activity of the major components of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. J Appl Bacteriol 78:264-269
These EOs included those obtained from the species Achyrocline satureioides (popularly known as "macela"), Aniba parviflora ("macacaporanga"), Aniba rosaeodora ("pau-rosa"), Anthemis nobilis ("Roman chamomile"), Conobea scoparioides ("pataqueira"), Cupressus sempervirens ("Italian cypress"), Ulicium verum ("star anise"), Lippia origanoides ("alecrim-d'Angola"), and Melaleuca alternifolia ("tea tree") (WESELER et al., 2005; GONZALEZ & MARIOLI, 2010; ROSATO et al., 2010; MONCAYO, 2012; AL-SNAFI, 2016; SILVA et al., 2016; IBRAHIM et al., 2017; NIKOLIC et al., 2017; PERERA et al., 2017).
Treatments were control (substrate+ 0.20 ml of 70% ethanol), and EO from Agonis fragrans, Eucalyptus plenissima, Leptospermum pettersoni, Melaleuca alternifolia, Melaleuca ericifolia, Melaleuca teretifolia, Santalum spicatum and Lavandula angustifolia, obtained commercially from Paperbark Co., Harvey, Weste rn Australia.
It can be found in most health food shops and is extracted from the leaves of the Melaleuca alternifolia, a tree native to Australia.
[USPRwire, Fri Nov 16 2018] Tea tree oil is distilled from the leaves of tea tree and also known as melaleuca alternifolia. Tea tree oil has wide application in cosmetics and personal care products due to its natural and antiseptic properties.
Different oils have been used to anaesthetize fish, such as Eugenia caryophyllata (Weber et al., 2009; Pawar et al., 2011), Cinnamomum camphora, Mentha arvensis (Pedrazzani and Ostrensky, 2014), Melaleuca alternifolia (Hajek 2011), Ocimum gratissimum (Benovit et al., 2012), Hesperozygis ringens and Ocotea acutifolia (Silva et al., 2013).
* Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea tree oil): 5% to 15 % preparations--oil gel--antiseptic an antifungal properties