Melanesian


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Mel·a·ne·sian

 (mĕl′ə-nē′zhən)
adj.
Of or relating to Melanesia or its peoples, languages, or cultures.
n.
1. A member of any of the indigenous peoples of Melanesia.
2. A subfamily of the Austronesian languages that includes the languages of Melanesia.

Melanesian

(ˌmɛləˈniːzɪən)
adj
(Languages) of or relating to Melanesia, its people, or their languages
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Melanesia: generally Negroid with frizzy hair and small stature
2. (Languages) a group or branch of languages spoken in Melanesia, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian family
3. (Languages) See also Neo-Melanesian
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Melanesian - of or relating to Melanesia or its people or culture
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Tambo is Melanesian for taboo, and is first cousin to that Polynesian word.
It was really a pretty face, viewed by any standard, and for a Melanesian it was a remarkably good-looking face.
It is an atoll, while the Solomons are high islands; and its people and language are Polynesian, while the inhabitants of the Solomons are Melanesian.
That there has been a slight Melanesian drift in the period of the northwest monsoon, is also evident.
In this the ancient was in nowise unlike the rest of his dark- skinned Melanesian race.
One of his tambos (tambo being beche-de-mer and Melanesian for "taboo") was that water unavoidable must never touch his skin.
Melanesian Christians enthralled with Judaism, I am proposing, seek to escape their historical legacy as colonial subjects by unwittingly reproducing the theological and rhetorical colonisation of Judaism.
for many years a missionary in the Chimbu Province of Papua New Guinea, later head of the Melanesian Institute for Social and Pastoral Research in Goroka, PNG, and still later director of the Society of the Divine Word's Anthropological Institute in Germany, provides readers with a fifteen-year chronicle (1962-77) and overview of Catholic missionary practice in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.
The population of about 250,000 people is composed of European and indigenous Melanesian (described locally as the Kanak) communities.
He covers sorcery, dreams, and death in a modern world; towards a history of travel in Melanesia: shamanism, dreams, and overseas journeys; technology, death and cargo cults in the Kaliai bush and in Bali and Pomio; madness, transgression, and hope in the Kaliai bush; and Melanesian fairy tales about whites.
Melanesian men and women, wearing grass skirts and colourful headbands, carried the Bible in a miniature dugout canoe as they sang, moved and danced to the beating of drums from the High Altar to the Cathedral's Compass Rose.
Within the Melanesian context, research ethics has a foundational role in meeting the challenges faced when researching in Melanesia.