Melanesian


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Mel·a·ne·sian

 (mĕl′ə-nē′zhən)
adj.
Of or relating to Melanesia or its peoples, languages, or cultures.
n.
1. A member of any of the indigenous peoples of Melanesia.
2. A subfamily of the Austronesian languages that includes the languages of Melanesia.

Melanesian

(ˌmɛləˈniːzɪən)
adj
(Languages) of or relating to Melanesia, its people, or their languages
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Melanesia: generally Negroid with frizzy hair and small stature
2. (Languages) a group or branch of languages spoken in Melanesia, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian family
3. (Languages) See also Neo-Melanesian
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Melanesian - of or relating to Melanesia or its people or culture
Translations
References in classic literature ?
One of his tambos (tambo being beche-de-mer and Melanesian for "taboo") was that water unavoidable must never touch his skin.
In this the ancient was in nowise unlike the rest of his dark- skinned Melanesian race.
Tambo is Melanesian for taboo, and is first cousin to that Polynesian word.
It was really a pretty face, viewed by any standard, and for a Melanesian it was a remarkably good-looking face.
It is an atoll, while the Solomons are high islands; and its people and language are Polynesian, while the inhabitants of the Solomons are Melanesian.
That there has been a slight Melanesian drift in the period of the northwest monsoon, is also evident.
Brother Edmund, from the Melanesian Brotherhood, and Sister Faith Ruth, from the Sisters of the Church, with fellow performers Picture: TONY KENWRIGHT
Only a fifth of plumbers, electricians and builders are Melanesian, and of the 8,675 construction companies, nearly 80 per cent are in the southern province in and around Noumea, with only 4.
LAWRENCE McCANE FMS, Melanesian Stories: Marist Brothers in Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea 1845-2003, Marist Brothers, Madang PNG, 2003; ISBN 9980-850421-9; 405 pages.
Melanesian Choirs, the original soundtrack from the movie The Thin Red Line.
This reconstruction of "traditional" Melanesian Kanak societies must be challenged today by the evidence of archaeology (Sand 1995, 2002b).
In a mixture of ancient Melanesian pagan and modern Christian ceremonies the people tried again to erase the misfortunes they believe have kept them poor since that long-ago meal.