meme

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meme

 (mēm)
n.
A unit of cultural information, such as a cultural practice or idea, that is transmitted verbally or by repeated action from one mind to another.

[Shortening (modeled on gene) of mimeme, from Greek mimēma, something imitated, from mimeisthai, to imitate; see mimesis.]

meme

(miːm)
n
(Psychology) an idea or element of social behaviour passed on through generations in a culture, esp by imitation
[C20: possibly from mimic, on the model of gene]

meme

(mim)
n.
a cultural item that is transmitted by repetition in a manner analogous to the biological transmission of genes.
[1976; <Greek mīmeîsthai to imitate, copy; coined by R. Dawkins, British biologist]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meme - a cultural unit (an idea or value or pattern of behavior) that is passed from one person to another by non-genetic means (as by imitation)meme - a cultural unit (an idea or value or pattern of behavior) that is passed from one person to another by non-genetic means (as by imitation); "memes are the cultural counterpart of genes"
acculturation, culture - all the knowledge and values shared by a society
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Meme theory can explain the workings of traditional referentiality, anaphora, and the use of repeated metrical patterns.
Given the lack of observable material content, some critics say that meme theory has no basis in science.
Thus, meme theory supplements scholarly understandings of frame theory in relationship to the contentions generated by the riot kiss: The meme is the way of seeing spread by the image and the arguments elicited from that pathogen.
Although, the utility of meme theory remains contested within academic discourse, especially concerning its ontological rendering of culture as a unit of transmission in a Darwinian competition for survival.
lt;<I am not saying that memes necessarily are close analogues of genes, Dawkins explains, only that the more like genes they are, the better will meme theory work>>.