memoir

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mem·oir

 (mĕm′wär′, -wôr′)
n.
1. An account of the personal experiences of an author.
2. often memoirs An autobiography.
3. A biography or biographical sketch.
4. A report, especially on a scientific or scholarly topic.
5. memoirs The report of the proceedings of a learned society.

[French mémoire, from Old French memoire, memory, from Latin memoria; see memory.]

mem′oir·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

memoir

(ˈmɛmwɑː)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a biography or historical account, esp one based on personal knowledge
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an essay or monograph, as on a specialized topic
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) obsolete a memorandum
[C16: from French, from Latin memoria memory]
ˈmemoirist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mem•oir

(ˈmɛm wɑr, -wɔr)

n.
1. a record of events based on the writer's personal observation.
2. Usu., memoirs.
a. an autobiography.
b. the published proceedings of an organization, as of a learned society.
3. a biography.
[1560–70; < French mémoire < Latin memoria]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

memoir

A biography or historical account based on personal knowledge; stylistically, memoirs usually indicate fragments of autobiography rather than a complete retelling.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.memoir - an account of the author's personal experiencesmemoir - an account of the author's personal experiences
autobiography - a biography of yourself
2.memoir - an essay on a scientific or scholarly topic
essay - an analytic or interpretive literary composition
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

memoir

noun account, life, record, register, journal, essay, biography, narrative, monograph He has just published a memoir in honour of his captain.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

memoir

noun
A narrative of experiences undergone by the writer:
commentary (often used in plural), reminiscence (often used in plural).
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
mälestusteraamat
emlékiratmemoár

memoir

[ˈmemwɑːʳ] N
1. memoirs (= autobiography) → memorias fpl, autobiografía fsing
2. (= biographical note) → nota f biográfica
3. (= essay) → memoria f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

memoir

[ˈmɛmwɑːr] nmémoire m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

memoir

n
memoirs plMemoiren pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

memoir

[ˈmɛmwɑːʳ] n (essay) → saggio monografico; (biography) → nota biografica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Chance Particulars: A Writer's Field Notebook for Travelers, Bloggers, Essayists, Memoirists, Novelists, Journalists, Adventurers, Naturalists, Sketchers, and Other Note-Takers and Recorders of Life
In addition to the number of classes on offer, two panels featuring a talented and experienced roster of guests will be held over the course of the weekend: on Saturday, "The Bold Truth: The Pros and Cons of Being All the Way Out There with Your Story" with memoirists Amy Ferris, Hollye Dexter, Linda Joy Myers; and on Sunday, "Get Published: A Conversation about Publishing from the Perspective of an Agent, a Traditional House Publisher, and a Hybrid Publisher" with publisher Krista Lyons of Seal Press, agent Liz Kracht of Kimberley Cameron & Associates, and Warner.
For the aspiring memoirists, she also shares her own technical and ethical rules for writing: she tells the truth (mostly), revises and re-envisions, notifies her subjects in advance of her writing, tries to judge people (her characters) kindly (and lets them pick their own pseudonyms), and determines who she is and how she wants to sound--while sharing anecdotes and analyses of Vladimir Nabokov, Maya Angelou, Augustine, Richard Wright, and other memoirists.
At the end, he even embraced one of the country's most famous memoirists and political activists, Elie Wiesel.
Caitlin Moran described her as "the Alan Bennett of pop memoirists".
With the publication of this second volume of autobiography, she cements her place as one of our leading memoirists.
For World War I enthusiasts and readers with an interest in the history of writing and journalism, this volume on American correspondents and memoirists in Europe from 1914 to 1918, provides a readable narrative journey through the day to day history of the war.
The obstacle faced by all war memoirists lies in describing "war" to an otherwise innocent audience.
All five memoirists' fictional and nonfictional writings serve as the foundation for a fine examination blending grief theory, attachment theory, and literary study in a recommendation for any college-level literary or health collection.
The use of pseudonyms, titles, dedications, and epigraphs provide a clearer picture of the genre though their use varies widely amongst the memoirs.As is expected, the typical conventions arise when the memoirists explain their own writing.
Silverman effectively addresses questions that loom large in the aspiring memoirists mind.