Mendel's law


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Mendel's law
Mendel's First Law: When a plant with two dominant (DD) alleles is crossed with a plant having two recessive (rr) alleles (top row), the first generation of plants (middle row) will all have one dominant and one recessive (Dr) allele. In the second generation (bottom row), on average one of four plants will have two recessive alleles.

Men·del's law

 (mĕn′dlz)
n.
1. One of two principles of heredity first formulated by Gregor Mendel, founded on his experiments with pea plants and stating that the members of a pair of homologous chromosomes segregate during meiosis and are distributed to different gametes. Also called law of segregation, principle of segregation.
2. The second of these two principles, stating that each member of a pair of homologous chromosomes segregates during meiosis independently of the members of other pairs, with the result that alleles carried on different chromosomes are distributed randomly to the gametes. Also called law of independent assortment, principle of independent assortment.

Men′del's law′


n.
1. Also called law of segregation. the principle stating that during the production of gametes the two copies of each hereditary factor segregate so that offspring acquire one factor from each parent.
2. Also called law of independent assortment. the principle stating that the laws of chance govern which particular characteristics of the parental pairs will occur in each individual offspring.
3. Also called law of dominance. the principle stating that one factor in a pair of traits dominates the other in inheritance unless both factors in the pair are recessive.
[1900–05; after German. J. Mendel]

Men·del's law

(mĕn′dlz)
Any of the principles first proposed by Gregor Mendel to describe the inheritance of traits passed from one generation to the next. The first (also called the law of segregation) states that during the formation of reproductive cells (gametes), pairs of hereditary factors (genes) for a specific trait separate so that offspring receive one factor from each parent. The second (also called the law of independent assortment) states that chance determines which factor for a particular trait is inherited. The third (also called the law of dominance) states that one of the factors for a pair of inherited traits will be dominant and the other recessive, unless both factors are recessive. See more at inheritance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mendel's law - (genetics) one of two principles of heredity formulated by Gregor Mendel on the basis of his experiments with plantsMendel's law - (genetics) one of two principles of heredity formulated by Gregor Mendel on the basis of his experiments with plants; the principles were limited and modified by subsequent genetic research
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
law of segregation - members of a pair of homologous chromosomes separate during the formation of gametes and are distributed to different gametes so that every gamete receives only one member of the pair
law of independent assortment - each member of a pair of homologous chromosomes separates independently of the members of other pairs so the results are random
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
References in periodicals archive ?
He was dealing with the Peas plants and worked out two laws of inheritance including Mendel's law of segregation and the law of independent assortment which are being very famous and strongly accepted in the scientific community now a days as well.
Mendel's Law of inheritance has stood the test of time for nearly 150 years.
Morgan discovered that Mendel's law of independent assortment is true only for genes that occur on different chromosomes--which happened to be the case for the seven pea elements.
His testimony consisted of a long discourse on the nature of feeblemindedness and the operation of Mendel's Law and the mechanism of heredity.
1900 - Hugo de Vries rediscovers Mendel's laws of genetics