suppression

(redirected from Menstrual suppression)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

sup·pres·sion

 (sə-prĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of suppressing.
2. The state of being suppressed.
3. Psychiatry Conscious exclusion of unacceptable desires, thoughts, or memories from the mind.
4. Botany The failure of an organ or part to develop.
5. Genetics The inhibition of gene expression.

suppression

(səˈprɛʃən)
n
1. the act or process of suppressing or the condition of being suppressed
2. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal the conscious avoidance of unpleasant thoughts. Compare repression2
3. (Electronics) electronics the act or process of suppressing a frequency, oscillation, etc
4. (Biology) biology the failure of an organ or part to develop
5. (Medicine) med the cessation of any physiological process

sup•pres•sion

(səˈprɛʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of suppressing.
2. the state of being suppressed.
3. Psychoanal.
a. conscious or unconscious inhibition of a painful memory or idea.
b. conscious inhibition of an impulse.
[1520–30; < Latin suppressiō a pressing down]

suppression

Temporary or transient degradation by an opposing force of the performance of a weapons system below the level needed to fulfill its mission objectives.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suppression - the failure to develop some part or organ
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
2.suppression - the act of withholding or withdrawing some book or writing from publication or circulation; "a suppression of the newspaper"
restraint - the act of controlling by restraining someone or something; "the unlawful restraint of trade"
3.suppression - forceful preventionsuppression - forceful prevention; putting down by power or authority; "the suppression of heresy"; "the quelling of the rebellion"; "the stifling of all dissent"
prevention, bar - the act of preventing; "there was no bar against leaving"; "money was allocated to study the cause and prevention of influenza"
crackdown - severely repressive actions
4.suppression - (psychology) the conscious exclusion of unacceptable thoughts or desires
abstinence - act or practice of refraining from indulging an appetite
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life

suppression

noun
1. elimination, crushing, crackdown, check, extinction, prohibition, quashing, dissolution, termination, clampdown They were imprisoned after the suppression of pro-democracy protests.
2. inhibition, blocking, checking, restriction, restraint, smothering suppression of the immune system
3. concealment, covering, hiding, disguising, camouflage A mother's suppression of her own feelings can cause problems.
4. hiding, censorship, hushing up, stonewalling suppression of official documents
Quotations
"Everybody knows there is no fineness or accuracy of suppression: if you hold down one thing, you hold down the adjoining" [Saul Bellow The Adventures of Augie March]

suppression

noun
Sudden punitive action:
Translations
قَمْع، كَبْت، إخْفاء
potlačenízákaz
tilbageholdelseundertrykkelse
elfojtáselhallgatás
niîurbæling; bann
baskıtutma

suppression

[səˈpreʃən] N [of symptoms, dissent, opposition, publication] → supresión f; [of feelings] → represión f; [of news, scandal, the truth] → ocultación f; [of revolt] → represión f

suppression

[səˈprɛʃən] n
[rebellion, revolt, activity] → répression f
[information] → suppression f; [scandal] → étouffement m
[immune system, appetite] → inhibition f

suppression

n
(of feelings, smile, dissent, views, symptoms, protest)Unterdrückung f; (of appetite)Zügelung f; (of information, evidence)Zurückhalten nt
(Elec) → Entstörung f

suppression

[səˈprɛʃn] n (of emotions) → repressione f; (of scandal) → soffocamento; (of truth) → il tacere; (of evidence) → occultamento; (of publication) → soppressione f

suppress

(səˈpres) verb
1. to defeat or put a stop to (eg a rebellion).
2. to keep back or stifle. She suppressed a laugh.
3. to prevent from being published, known etc. to suppress information.
supˈpression (-ʃən) noun

sup·pres·sion

n. supresión.
1. fallo súbito del cuerpo en la producción de una excreción o secreción normal;
2. en psicoanólisis, la inhibición de una idea o deseo.

suppression

n (psych, etc.) supresión f
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary indications for IUD use were contraception (85.2%) in the SA group and abnormal uterine bleeding (43.9%) and menstrual suppression (24.4%) in the NSA group.
It is also aimed at exploring the awareness of menstrual suppression among parents/guardians of these girls and the associated factors that influenced their decision of menstrual suppression methods.
Plastic bodies: sex hormones and menstrual suppression in Brazil.
To learn more information on menstrual suppression's risks, safety concerns, and benefits, check out our Fact Sheet: www.nwhn.org/ menstrual-suppression.
Therefore, menstrual suppression with continuous combined hormonal contraception or progestin-only methods, including the hormonal IUD and implant, may be ideal.
Calling for more fine-grained analysis of menstrual suppression, Jarvis introduces Japanese British performance artist Sputniko (aka Hiromi Ozaki) who commands a spaceship in the shape of a tampon and sings about suffering menstrual pain, rejecting the reproductive imperative, and preferring the life of a cyborg over that of a maternal goddess (217).
NEW YORK -- Demographic and menstrual suppression trends hinder growth of the feminine care category, but its size alone gives it huge significance for chain drug retailers.
This article builds on this growing body of work by demonstrating how the neoliberal interpretation of choice is employed to put forward a scientific rationale for the use of extended-cycle oral contraception (ECOC) for the purpose of menstrual suppression. It draws on comparative discourse analysis of two fields involved in the debates about menstrual suppression?
The recent approvals for extended use hormonal contraceptive medications that induce menstrual suppression in healthy women and girls, variously known as Lybrel (2007), Seasonale (2003) and Seasonique (2006) in the US, and Seasonale (2007) in Canada, have largely been greeted with uncritical praise in the mainstream media, and been given the stamp of approval by several leading professional medical organizations.
Clearly, many of the menstruation-related health problems menstrual suppression purports to solve are not caused by menstruation, but by US society's prescribed treatment of menstruation.
The need to bleed: women's attitudes and beliefs about menstrual suppression. J Am Acad Nurse Pract 2004;16:31-7.
Monthly menstruation can be suppressed by an extended regimen of oral contraception, but a sample of 1,470 women in the US suggests that the vast majority (78%) had never heard of menstrual suppression. Many of them (60%) thought it would be a good idea to suppress or reduce menstruation but expressed concerns about safety and the need for more research.