cognition

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Related to Mental stimulus: cognitive process, cognitions

cog·ni·tion

 (kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

[Middle English cognicioun, from Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn : co-, intensive pref.; see co- + gnōscere, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·ni′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cognition

(kɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Psychology) the mental act or process by which knowledge is acquired, including perception, intuition, and reasoning
2. the knowledge that results from such an act or process
[C15: from Latin cognitiō, from cognōscere from co- (intensive) + nōscere to learn; see know]
cogˈnitional adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cog•ni•tion

(kɒgˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or process of knowing; perception.
2. something known or perceived.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin cognitiō <cogni-, variant s. of cognōscere to get to know (co- co- + (g)nōscere to get to know) + -tiō -tion]
cog•ni′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoningcognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
place - an abstract mental location; "he has a special place in my thoughts"; "a place in my heart"; "a political system with no place for the less prominent groups"
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
episteme - the body of ideas that determine the knowledge that is intellectually certain at any particular time
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
inability - lack of ability (especially mental ability) to do something
lexis - all of the words in a language; all word forms having meaning or grammatical function
lexicon, mental lexicon, vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
cognitive factor - something immaterial (as a circumstance or influence) that contributes to producing a result
equivalent - a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; "send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps"
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
unconscious process, process - a mental process that you are not directly aware of; "the process of denial"
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
history - all that is remembered of the past as preserved in writing; a body of knowledge; "the dawn of recorded history"; "from the beginning of history"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cognition

noun (Formal) perception, reasoning, understanding, intelligence, awareness, insight, comprehension, apprehension, discernment processes of perception and cognition
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

cognition

[kɒgˈnɪʃən] Ncognición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cognition

nErkenntnis f; (visual) → Wahrnehmung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cognition

[ˌkɒgˈnɪʃn] n (frm) → apprendimento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cog·ni·tion

n. cognición, conocimiento, acción y efecto de conocer.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
From the minute you step out of the house you are bombarded with visual, sonic, mental stimulus -- a lot of it is unnecessary, loud and quite frankly, noise.
PTSD is currently handled as a mental-mental claim, which refers to a mental stimulus that causes a mental injury.
If too dull and isolated the narrative switches to the stupidity of keeping young men locked up in a prison without enough mental stimulus, hence their unadventurous and stale performances.
If it's too dull and A-isolated, the narrative switches to the stupidity of keeping young men locked up in a near-prison A-without enough mental stimulus, hence their stale and unadventurous performances.