mensch

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mensch

or mensh  (mĕnsh)
n. pl. mensch·es or mensch·en (mĕn′shən) Informal
A person of integrity and honor.

[Yiddish, human being, mensch, from Middle High German, human being, from Old High German mennisco; see man- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mensch

(mɛnʃ)
n
informal US a good person
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mensch

(mɛntʃ)

n. Informal.
a decent and responsible person.
[1950–55; < Yiddish mentsh man, human being < Middle High German mensch, Old High German mennisco, mannisco; see man, -ish1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mensch - a decent responsible person with admirable characteristicsmensch - a decent responsible person with admirable characteristics
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
good person - a person who is good to other people
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"He's a quintessential mentsch," said Rabbi Schneur Kaplan of the Downtown Jewish Center in Ft.
Wer wirth czum mordenn, huren, stelen, liegen beczwungen den der faull, muethwilligk und viehisch mentsch, der seinem boBen fleysch wie rolg wind esell nochfolgeth, Ps.
But as the old Yiddish saying goes, "Mentsch tracht, Gott lacht" Translation: "Man plans, God laughs." Although conversion would probably have posed no problem back in the days of the American-dominated, Conservative Jewish pre- and postwar Temple Emil, this could not even be contemplated in the Syrian-dominated, Aleppo-style Orthodox Bet Ya'akov of 1994.