Mercator projection


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Related to Mercator projection: Transverse Mercator projection
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Mercator projection

Mercator projection

n.
A cylindrical map projection in which the meridians and parallels appear as lines crossing at right angles and in which areas appear greater farther from the equator. Straight line segments represent true bearings, thus making this projection useful for navigation.

[After Gerhardus Mercator.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Mercator projection

(mɜːˈkeɪtə)
n
(Physical Geography) an orthomorphic map projection on which parallels and meridians form a rectangular grid, scale being exaggerated with increasing distance from the equator. Also called: Mercator's projection
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Merca′tor

(or Merca′tor's) projec`tion,


n.
a conformal map projection on which any rhumb line is represented as a straight line, used chiefly in navigation, though the scale varies with latitude and areal size and the shapes of large areas are distorted.
[1660–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Mercator projection

Mer·ca·tor projection

(mər-kā′tər)
A method of making a flat map of the Earth's surface so that the meridians and parallels appear as straight lines that cross at right angles. In a Mercator projection, the areas farther from the equator appear larger, making the polar regions greatly distorted. Compare conic projection, homolosine projection, sinusoidal projection.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Mercator projection

A type of cylindrical map projection in which the lines of latitude and longitude intersect at right angles.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mercator projection - a map projection of the earth onto a cylinderMercator projection - a map projection of the earth onto a cylinder; areas appear greater the farther they are from the equator
map projection - a projection of the globe onto a flat map using a grid of lines of latitude and longitude
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In these collages, which transcend the decorative, Kher employs the bindi symbolically to subvert the colonialist sense of superiority inherent in the Mercator projection system--as well as in the Western art world.
Until now, Google Maps has use Mercator projection, which projects our planet as a flat surface, in the hopes of making it easier to see roads.
That's ok for navigating especially since maps uses Mercator projection. Mercator projection essentially makes it easy to print the map on to a flat surface and adds the convenience of making a right turn look like a right turn when reading the map on your device.
Indeed, the book is structured with its three sections (made up of two chapters each) focussed on these three major mapping projects: the International Map of the World (IMW), the Universal Transverse Mercator projection (UTM), and Global Positioning Systems (GPS).
Bottom: 360-degree image of a common murre egg Natural History Museum, Copenhagen, Denmark, circa 2013 Constructed from eight individual photos joined together in a Mercator projection.
The world map we are all familiar with is based on the Mercator projection, a cylindrical projection created in 1569 by Gerardus Mercator for use in ship navigation.
One factor that may have skewed our perception of our country's size is the use of Mercator projection in most maps.
The Mercator Projection was particularly well-suited to its time
The concept of space projections is generalized from the initial work of Colvocoresess, who pioneered the field while with cartographic coordinator for earth satellite mapping at the United States Geological Survey in 1974 with the space oblique Mercator projection (SOM) (Colvocoresses 1974).