meringue

(redirected from Mereng)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to Mereng: merengue

me·ringue

 (mə-răng′)
n.
1. A mixture of egg whites and sugar beaten until stiff and baked until slightly brown, often used as a topping on pies.
2. A confection made by baking a lump or dollop of this mixture, often with added ingredients such as nuts or cocoa.

[French meringue.]

meringue

(məˈræŋ)
n
1. (Cookery) stiffly beaten egg whites mixed with sugar and baked, often as a topping for pies, cakes, etc
2. (Cookery) a small cake or shell of this mixture, often filled with cream
[C18: from French, origin obscure]

me•ringue

(məˈræŋ)

n.
1. egg whites stiffly beaten with sugar and browned in the oven, often used as topping for cream-filled pies.
2. a dessert shell made by baking such a mixture, often filled with fruit or cream.
3. a pie topped with meringue.
[1700–10; < French méringue; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meringue - sweet topping especially for pies made of beaten egg whites and sugarmeringue - sweet topping especially for pies made of beaten egg whites and sugar
topping - a flavorful addition on top of a dish
Translations
sněhová pusinkasníh
marengs
marenki
masa od tučenog bjelanjka i šećera
habcsók
marengs
メレンゲ
머랭
bezėmorengas
bezē
snehová pusinka
maräng
ขนมอบที่ใช้ไข่ขาวตีจนฟูแล้วอบ
bánh trứng đường

meringue

[məˈræŋ] Nmerengue m

meringue

[məˈræŋ] n
(= topping, filling) → meringue f
(= cake) → meringue f

meringue

nMeringe f, → Baiser nt

meringue

[məˈræŋ] nmeringa

meringue

(məˈrӕŋ) noun
(a cake made from) a crisp cooked mixture of sugar and white of eggs.

meringue

مرنـغ sníh marengs Baiser μαρέγγα merengue marenki meringue masa od tučenog bjelanjka i šećera meringa メレンゲ 머랭 schuimpje marengs beza merengue меренга maräng ขนมอบที่ใช้ไข่ขาวตีจนฟูแล้วอบ beze bánh trứng đường 蛋白与糖的混合物
References in periodicals archive ?
Mereng (2010) in her narrative research on her own and others' experiences in Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya, explains the conflict over which schooling system to implement in that particular camp.
One of them links merengue to the Haitian mereng. Some researchers say that mereng developed from the African music of the slaves such as chica and calenda mixed with the French contradanse.
He discusses a number of musical forms including rara, mereng, misik twoubadou, and also relatively recent syncretic genres such as "vodou jazz." Chapter 7, on Jamaica, describes the history of mento, reggae, and other internationally recognized genres as well as providing information on relatively obscure music traditions (e.g., Kumina ceremony, recent "ragga" dance music).