Merovingian

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Mer·o·vin·gi·an

 (mĕr′ə-vĭn′jē-ən, -jən)
A Frankish ruling dynasty (c. ad 450-751) founded by Merovech (fl. fifth century) and brought to prominence by Clovis I.

Mer′o·vin′gi·an adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Merovingian

(ˌmɛrəʊˈvɪndʒɪən)
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to a Frankish dynasty founded by Clovis I, which ruled Gaul and W Germany from about 500 to 751 ad
n
(Historical Terms) a member or supporter of this dynasty
[C17: from French, from Medieval Latin Merovingi offspring of Merovaeus, Latin form of Merowig, traditional founder of the line]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Merovingian - a member of the Merovingian dynastyMerovingian - a member of the Merovingian dynasty
Merovingian dynasty, Merovingian - a Frankish dynasty founded by Clovis I that reigned in Gaul and Germany from about 500 to 750
crowned head, monarch, sovereign - a nation's ruler or head of state usually by hereditary right
2.Merovingian - a Frankish dynasty founded by Clovis I that reigned in Gaul and Germany from about 500 to 750Merovingian - a Frankish dynasty founded by Clovis I that reigned in Gaul and Germany from about 500 to 750
dynasty - a sequence of powerful leaders in the same family
Merovingian - a member of the Merovingian dynasty
Adj.1.Merovingian - of or relating to the Merovingian dynasty or its membersMerovingian - of or relating to the Merovingian dynasty or its members
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Merovingian

[ˌmerəʊˈvɪn>dʒɪən]
A. ADJmerovingio
B. Nmerovingio/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
151) but the majority come from Merovingian period (600-800 AD) graves and this type of spearhead is named after the find spot of one characteristic specimen and they are known as Yliskyla-type spearheads (Salmo 1938, 164 ff; Kivikoski 1973, fig.
The cathedral museum in the medieval cloister shows exhibits from the cathedral's treasury and spectacular finds from the grave of a girl from the late Merovingian period in the 7th century.
Subsequent sections address different surface analysis methods for the characterization of reactive glass surfaces, infrared and raman spectroscopy and microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for the characterization of the chemical environment of metals in silicate glass materials, followed by studies of these methods to characterize archaeological glass fragments, historic museum pieces in glass, or other related materials, including Roman glass, European trade beads in Northeastern North America, Venetian soda glass, historic English lead glass, and Spanish monuments, and those from Bronze Age Italy, the Merovingian period in Western Europe, South and Southeast Asia, the Middle East, the Medieval period, and Versailles.
The ground floor also contains displays on Roman battle campaigns and the Merovingian period, along with a caretaker's flat, which is isolated from the displays and housed in the projecting stub of the longer wing.
Through a comparative, philological study Kitchen seeks to lay the foundation for further systematic investigations of the hagiography produced by and about females during the Merovingian period. Saints' Lives and the Rhetoric of Gender is a revision of the doctoral dissertation Kitchen completed at the University of Toronto's Centre for Medieval Studies in 1995.
The advent of the Carolingian dynasty, and the energetic efforts of the Carolingians to blacken the name of the Merovingian dynasty they replaced, mean that the Merovingian period has suffered in the eyes of generations of historians.
Osteological material.--Vainionmaki--a Merovingian Period Cemetery in Laitila, Finland.
The topics include practices of property and the salvation of one's soul: priests as men in the middle in the Wissembourg material, <presbyter in parochia sua/>: local priests and their churches in early medieval Bavaria, ideal and reality: Carolingian priests in northern Francia, looking for local priests in Anglo-Saxon England, priests and books in the Merovingian period, and </pater noster/>: priests and the religious instruction of the laity in the Carolingian </populus christianus/>.
Unto Salo has also stated, drawing on the change in burial customs in Finland during the Merovingian Period (AD 550-800), that the world view of people changed entirely (Salo 2012b, 214).
From the Late Roman to the Merovingian Period, then, we find sites with intense evidence of long-distance exchange in the south-west Baltic area in very similar locations: At an open coast near the entrance to a narrow strait or sound that would demand foreign vessels to navigate uncomfortably close to inhabited coastal regions.
However, contacts and exchanges with Scandinavian elite groups were still active, as is shown by the wide distribution of the artefacts, mostly two-edged swords (an artefact form quite foreign to the Merovingian period Baltics), ornamented with animal art of Salin Styles II and III (Era-Esko 1984; Hoilund-Nielsen 2000; Raninen 2005).
Their topics include on the threshold: </Paul the Silentiary's> ekphrasis of Hagia Sophia, from taboo to icon: the entrance to and the exit from the church in the first three Greek liturgical commentaries (about 500-730 CE), the paradise of Saint Peter's, the door to the sanctuary from Paulinus of Nola to Gregory of Tours: enduring characteristics and evolutions from the Theodosian to the Merovingian periods, and filters of light: Greek temple doors as portals of epiphany.