Masorah

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Ma·so·ra

also Ma·so·rah  (mə-sôr′ə)
n.
1. The body of Judaic tradition relating to correct textual reading of the Hebrew scriptures.
2. The critical notes made on manuscripts of the Hebrew scriptures before the tenth century, which embody this tradition.

[Hebrew māsôrâ, from māsar, to hand over; see msr in Semitic roots.]

Mas′o·ret′ic (măs′ə-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

Ma•so•rah

or Ma•so•ra

(məˈsɔr ə, -ˈsoʊr ə)

n.
a body of scribal notes that form a textual guide to the Hebrew Old Testament, compiled from the 7th to 10th centuries A.D.
[< Hebrew māsōrāh]
Mas•o•ret•ic (ˌmæs əˈrɛt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Masorah - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of textsMasorah - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of texts
textual criticism - comparison of a particular text with related materials in order to establish authenticity
References in periodicals archive ?
Jacob Beer and Guy Solomonov of Greiner-Maltz represented Alpha and the seller, Mesorah Publications, a publisher of books and commentaries from an Orthodox Jewish perspective.
Adapted from "Perfect Flavors: Creative, Easy-to-Prepare Recipes Inspired by My Family and Travels," by Naomi Nachman (Mesorah Publications, 2018).
A series of RCA resolutions against female clergy - resolutions reviewed and supported by the RCA's poskim, are based on Halacha and Mesorah, as further demonstrated at length by the rabbinic panel convened by the Orthodox Union.
These straight-talking, commonsensical essays are drawn from life, from history, from the world as it really is, from the world as it ought to be, from the mesorah of our forebears, and from the teachings of our sages.
But you might be surprised to learn that the idea of Jewish werewolves is a long-winded mesorah. They may not all have bar mitzvahs, but if you count off the usual tenets of a werewolf storyfollowing a lunar calendar, dashing off when the sun goes down, making excuses for weird disappearances, accusations, hunts, being driven off by suspicious townspeopleit's easy to guess why Jewish creators throughout the years have chosen the werewolf as a central horror figure.
More recently The Artscroll Siddur (Brooklyn, NY: Mesorah Publications), pp.
See, for example, Shimon Finkelman, Reb Moshe: The Life and Ideals of HaGaon Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (Brooklyn: Mesorah, 1986), 48-53; Yonason Rosenblum, Reb Yaakov: The Life and Times of HaGaon Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky (Brooklyn: Mesorah, 1993), TI5-I9; Shimon Finkelman, Rav Patn: The Life and Ideals of Rabbi Avrohom Yaakov HaKohen Pam (Brooklyn: Mesorah, 2003), 45; and Yitzchok Dershowitz, A Living 'Mishnas Rav Aharon': The Legacy of Maran Rav Aharon Kotler (Jerusalem: Feldheim, 2005), 73.
(73) In order to translate and explain we used a few translations of The Mishnah: Artscroll Mishnah Series (Brooklyn, NY: Mesorah Publications, 1983); Mishnayoth, translated by Philip Blackman (New York: Judaica Press, 1964); Talmud Bavli: Schottenstein Edition (Brooklyn, NY: Mesorah Publications, 1992).
ACASE STUDY IN THE AMERICANIZATION OF THE MESORAH:LILTH
(14) See, for example, Meir Zlotowitz, Jonah." A New Translation with a Commentary, Anthologized from Talmudic, Midrashic and Rabbinic Sources (New York: Mesorah, 2003).
According to his principal biographer (Yonason Rosenblum, Reb Shraga Feivel: The Life and Times of Rabbi Shraga Feivel Mendlowitz, the Architect of Torah in America, Artscroll Mesorah, 2001), Mendlowitz--like his son-in-law, Rabbi Linchner--was sympathetic to the Torah Im Derech Eretz views of Samson Raphael Hirsch, and was reprimanded by the yeshiva administration for reading the German language works of Hirsch.
Ramban, Commentary on the Torah, Genesis I (NY Mesorah, 2001; 2009, translated & Annotated by Rabbi Yaakov Blinder and Rabbi Yoseph Kamenetsky)