metanarrative

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metanarrative

(ˈmɛtəˌnærətɪv)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in postmodernist literary theory) a narrative about a narrative or narratives
[C20: from meta- + narrative]
References in periodicals archive ?
Defeat and occupation had not only discredited the state and its patriotic wartime meta-narrative, it had seemingly rendered the traditional symbols of national unity--the flag and the national anthem--obsolete.
She investigates 100 years 1912-2012 of how Urdu adab has been evaluated in terms of meta-narrative, logocentrism, new colonialism and hyperrealism, among other elements, and how the style has evolved over time and posits her observations against those proffered by Western theorists about Western literature.
It was a fun meta-narrative about the relationship between an author and his own dark creations.
APHSA membership is a key influencer and driver of a widely adopted meta-narrative that facilitates finding common ground and advancing solutions that are adaptable locally, centered on the whole family and that help build thriving communities (VC stages 3 and 4).
As a researcher who focuses on online communities, I'm accustomed to this running meta-narrative about what it is I'm actually doing online - but usually, that narrative plays inside my head, not all the way down the feed I'm scrolling through.
This is part of a meta-narrative. A smaller group which symbolic interaction specializes in its analysis is the most important.
Probably their elements of beliefs have some relations because beliefs on the basis of miracle get developed in meta-narrative, but although these beliefs are structurally different.
A Meta-narrative in support of polio vaccination from progressive religious scholars is the need of the hour as Pakistan is one of the few countries where the disease is yet to be defeated.
"There's this meta-narrative out there, and you're echoing it because it's your job," he told Smith.
This meta-narrative of provincial nationalism rides roughshod over the aspirations of minor identities within and tried to subsume these under the category of geographic nationalism where majoritarian politics defines the identities of minority linguistic or cultural groups.
In what sometimes seems more historiography than history, he does not try to construct any particular meta-narrative about John Wyclif or lollards.
At times, this quality of characterization leads to a theatrical self-reflexivity that is so readily discernible in McDonagh's writing; at others a deliberately simplistic stereo typing of character shifts our attention onto a meta-narrative story-within-story intertextuality that also permeates his work.