metaphysics

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met·a·phys·ics

(mĕt′ə-fĭz′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) Philosophy The branch of philosophy that examines the nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, substance and attribute, possibility and actuality.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The theoretical or first principles of a particular discipline: the metaphysics of law.
3. (used with a sing. verb) A priori speculation upon questions that are unanswerable to scientific observation, analysis, or experiment.
4. (used with a sing. verb) Excessively subtle or recondite reasoning.

[From pl. of Middle English methaphisik, from Medieval Latin metaphysica, from Medieval Greek (ta) metaphusika, from Greek (Ta) meta (ta) phusika, (the works) after the Physics, the title of Aristotle's treatise on first principles (so called because it followed his work on physics) : meta, after; see meta- + phusika, physics; see physics.]

metaphysics

(ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Philosophy) the branch of philosophy that deals with first principles, esp of being and knowing
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical study of the nature of reality, concerned with such questions as the existence of God, the external world, etc
3. (Philosophy) See descriptive metaphysics
4. (popularly) abstract or subtle discussion or reasoning
[C16: from Medieval Latin, from Greek ta meta ta phusika the things after the physics, from the arrangement of the subjects treated in the works of Aristotle]
metaphysician, metaphysicist n

met•a•phys•ics

(ˌmɛt əˈfɪz ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the branch of philosophy that treats of first principles, includes ontology and cosmology, and is intimately connected with epistemology.
2. philosophy, esp. in its more abstruse branches.

metaphysics

a branch of philosophy concerned with being, first principles, and often including aspects of cosmology and epistemology. — metaphysician, n.metaphysical, adj.
See also: Philosophy

metaphysics

A branch of philosophy dealing with questions of being.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowingmetaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowing
hypostasis - (metaphysics) essential nature or underlying reality
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
ontology - the metaphysical study of the nature of being and existence
cosmology - the metaphysical study of the origin and nature of the universe
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Translations

metaphysics

[ˌmetəˈfɪzɪks] NSINGmetafísica f

metaphysics

[ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks] nmétaphysique f

metaphysics

n singMetaphysik f

metaphysics

[ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks] nsgmetafisica
References in periodicals archive ?
They thereafter delve deeper into the meta-physics of their mass-energy relationship.
He covers formal theory on the subject (meta-physics); the greater logics: the transcendental, the object, and relation; the four forms of change; the theory of points; what a body is; and what it is to live.
He stressed the need to integrate science with society in such a way that art, literature, religion, and meta-physics all are absorbed in scientific pursuits.
Aristotle's books famously were ordered (or, perhaps taught) such that the more speculative ones were after physics ie meta-physics; early Aristotelian scholars called those books [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], ta meta ta physika biblia, which means "the books that come after the (books about) physics." It is normal to define physics as "the natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through space and time, along with related concepts such as energy and force" (Wikipedia Sept 26 2016).
At the same time, in fact soon after Mach launched his epistemological program towards "purifying absolutism in science" (especially in Newtonian and celestial mechanics) in Europe, Russia, witnessed heated debates of the nature of science and philosophy vis-a-vis Reality as contested by the likes of Ouspensky (who defended the simultaneously neo-Platonic and neo-Aristotelian traditions of meta-physics), Bogdanov (who tried to generalize Machian thought into a single "empirico-monism"), and those who harshly forced the notion of "materialism over Machianism and all sorts of psychologism and idealism" on scores of Soviet scientists, gaining ultimate support from materialist philosophers and scientists such as the foremost expert on the "reflexes of the higher nervous system", Ivan Pavlov.